Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Radiology programs would benefit from incorporating tablet devices into education of residents

01.06.2012
Radiology programs and their residents would benefit from incorporating tablet devices, like the iPad, into residency education, according to a study in the June issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

The methods used to learn and teach radiology are evolving, and mobile technology is playing a role. It is widely expected that tablet devices will bring change to radiology education. However, few studies have examined the impact of mobile devices on radiology residency education.

A multi-institutional survey study was conducted among radiology residents across the United States from June 13 to July 5, 2011, with a total of 308 participants. The survey questionnaire consisted of 12 questions and assessed the type of institution, the levels of training of the respondents and book funds allocated to residents. It also assessed the residents' study habits, access to portable devices and use of printed and electronic radiology resources.

Study results showed considerable use of online resources and mobile devices among radiology residents, with 74 percent owning smart phones and 37 percent owning tablet devices. Respondents indicated that they spend nearly an equal amount of time learning radiology from printed textbooks as they do from electronic resources. Eighty-one percent of respondents believe that they would spend more time learning radiology if provided with a tablet device.

"Tablet technology has the potential to enhance the way radiology is studied and taught. Benefits, such as more study time, may be obtained by radiology programs that incorporate tablet devices into the education of their residents. However, further studies would be helpful to objectively compare the amount of time residents spend learning radiology before and after the ownership of tablet devices," said Aiham C. Korbage, MD, co-author of the study.

For more information, or to schedule an interview with a JACR spokesperson, please contact Heather Curry at 703-390-9822 or PR@acr.org.

Heather Curry | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.acr.org

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Heart examinations: Miniature particle accelerator saves on contrast agents
27.02.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate
21.02.2017 | Radiological Society of North America

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>