Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mammography reduces mortality from breast cancer in ages 40–49 years

30.09.2010
Mammography examinations of women aged 40–49 reduce breast cancer mortality by 29%, a statistically significant reduction. This is shown in the Umeå-directed national SCRY Study in Sweden, which is the largest study of its kind ever performed anywhere in the world.

X-ray examination of all women’s breasts with the aim of discovering breast cancer, so-called mammography screening, saves the lives of many women each year in that tumors are found early and can therefore be treated early.

However, a lower age limit for mammography screening is necessary, as younger women run a lower risk of developing breast cancer, which means that more women would have to undergo mammography in order to save the corresponding number of lives. What’s more, mammography works less well in younger women.

The SCRY Study (mammography SCReening of Young women) compares breast cancer mortality between a study group consisting of those counties/municipalities that have invited the age group and a control group consisting of areas that have only invited women aged 50 and older. Only deaths caused by breast cancer in the ages of 40–49 were counted. The average follow-up period was 16 years for both the study group and the control group. The study is the largest ever undertaken for the 40–49 age group in the world. Data from the cancer registry and the cause of death registry have been used. Further, individual data from screening centers throughout Sweden have been gathered, making it possible to study the effect both on women who were offered mammography and on women who actually participated.

The study covers the entire country. It comprises 803 breast cancer deaths over 7.3 million person years in the study group (which underwent mammography) and 1,238 breast cancer deaths over 8.8 million person years in the control group. The mean number of women aged 40–49 years in Sweden during the study period was 600,000. The study shows that breast cancer mortality was 26% lower for those who were invited to mammography screening compared with those who were not. Those who actually participated in mammography screening had a 29% lower breast cancer mortality rate than those who were not invited to screening. The findings are statistically significant.

A comparison between the group that underwent mammography and the control group that was undertaken for a period before screening started uncovered no statistically significant difference in breast cancer mortality. Breast cancer care in Sweden has moreover been further standardized since that time, not least as a result of care programs and national guidelines. This indicates that the difference in breast cancer mortality is a result of access to mammography screening among 40–49-year-olds.

There is a consensus today that mammography screening for the 50–69-year age group reduces breast cancer mortality. Calling in women aged 40–49 years for mammography screening, on the other hand, has been controversial and much debated since the 1980s, when mammography screening began. Few studies have been able to show any significant effect on mortality in the age group. At the same time, few studies have been designed to study the age group in particular. The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recommends screening for the entire age interval of 40–74 years, whereas EU guidelines do not include 40–49-year-olds in their recommendations. In the U.S., the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently changed its recommendations not to include the 40–49 age group.

Originally the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recommended that women aged 40–69 years should be called in for screening. Soon after, these recommendations were changed to focus on women between the ages of 50 and 74. As a result, for a long period roughly half of Swedish counties and municipalities have called in 40–49-year-olds for screening, while about half have chosen to call in only women aged 50 and over.

For more information, please contact Barbro Hellquist, doctoral candidate at the Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University. She can be reached at: Telephone: +46 (0)90-785 48 49 E-mail barbro.hellquist@oc.umu.se

Pressofficer Bertil Born; +46-703 886 058; bertil.born@adm.umu.se

Bertil Born | idw
Further information:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.25650/full
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht 3-D visualization of the pancreas -- new tool in diabetes research
15.03.2017 | Umea University

nachricht New PET radiotracer identifies inflammation in life-threatening atherosclerosis
02.03.2017 | Society of Nuclear Medicine

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>