Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

University of the Basque Country researchers decode transcriptome for grey mullet

29.01.2010
The Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology research team at the Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) has decoded the transcriptome for the grey mullet. The director of the research project was Mr Ibon Cancio.

On more than one occasion we will have heard that the genome is the library where all the information of each organism is stored. This information is organised in various genes, where the information to synthesise the proteins that carry out most cell functions is stored.

The genome also has another type of genetic material that is not in the genes. This is the transcriptome - the part of the genome that is transcribed or is read. In most pluricellular beings it is usually more or less 1.5% of the genome.

This UPV/EHU research team has just decoded the transcriptome of the grey mullet. For a number of years now the researchers have been measuring the quality of river and sea water. For this it was necessary to have an animal capable of living in contaminated areas, one of which is the grey mullet. The aim was to measure the response that this animal has to contamination, in order to better know the quality of surrounding water. Besides, the grey mullet is very abundant in the rivers and sea of the Basque Country. Thus, according to Mr Cancio, it is the appropriate animal model, being very abundant and capable of surviving in contaminated areas.

More than half of the genes

The research was initiated in the Basque fishing port of Ondarroa, gathering a number of grey mullets: males, females, young fish, etc. Organs such as the liver, gills, gonads and brain were extirpated from each and the messenger RNA extracted. These samples of messenger RNA were suitably mixed to ensure that most of the transcriptome of the species would be found in the overall sample. Subsequently, the messenger RNA was converted to complementary DNA.

The samples of complementary DNA were sent to the sequencing department at the University of Newcastle in Britain. This university has a new sequencing system whereby, with just one analysis lasting seven and a half hours, 400,000 cDNA, can be sequenced, each with a length of 250 nucleotides. This was how the UPV/EHU research team obtained all the information about the transcriptome of the grey mullet; 126 million nucleotides, in concrete.

The most laborious task came later - making sense of all the information obtained, i.e. identifying the genes for each sequence, given that the function of the sequence can be found out from the gene. To this end, help from the General Research Services (SGIker) of the UPV/EHU was required.

Following this procedure, 18,332 genes were obtained. The aim was not to identify all the genes of the grey mullet, but more than half of them. With all this information a DNA microchip was developed in order to investigate the response of the mentioned genes to contamination.

For the upcoming year the challenge for the UPV/EHU research team to decode the transcriptome of the slug in order to generate a health profile of the soil.

Amaia Portugal | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.elhuyar.com

Further reports about: Basque DNA RNA UPV/EHU cell death messenger RNA synthetic biology

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Topologische Quantenchemie
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

nachricht Topological Quantum Chemistry
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

24.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>