Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Turbo-Packed RNA

05.11.2010
Turbo Reagent Allows Precise Synthesis of tRNA Nucleosides

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a biologically important molecule that is very similar to DNA, the blueprint of life. Naturally occurring RNAs, such as transfer RNA (tRNA), contain modified building blocks (“nucleosides”), which are involved in decoding genetic information.

Deazaguanosine nucleosides, in particular, are of significant interest for their antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and anticancer activity. In the European Journal of Organic Chemistry, Thomas Carell and his team at Munich's Ludwig Maximilians University (Germany) have now introduced a method to prepare tRNA nucleosides through a novel Turbo-Grignard-based approach with an unprecedented level of control from a common intermediate.

Because of the biological importance of deazaguanosines, a reliable method for their preparation is desirable. In this way, scientists can easily study their functions and the role they play in the treatment of diseases. One of the problems for synthetic chemists, however, is that these compounds often contain various reactive groups at several locations within the molecule. Precise control over the reactivity at a single position can therefore be difficult. Thus, the development of a site-specific reagent is required.

For their synthesis, the authors opted to use the versatile Turbo-Grignard reagent. The “normal” Grignard reagent is used by chemists to introduce a group into a molecule at a reactive site; it consists of the group to be added complexed to the metal magnesium. The Turbo-Grignard is also complexed to a lithium salt, which generally allows reactions to be performed under mild conditions – an important advantage when dealing with biologically relevant compounds.

In their article, the team shows that the Turbo-Grignard reagent has a specific point of attack and that it can be used in the presence of other reactive groups. Importantly, an adjacent group that proved problematic under different conditions was found to be completely unreactive to the turbo reagent, thereby allowing efficient synthesis of the desired nucleosides; the same reaction performed with the “normal” Grignard reagent resulted in decomposition of the desired products. The fact that other reactive groups in the molecule remain untouched facilitates the synthesis of deazaguanosine-derived tRNA nucleosides, which should enable detailed biochemical investigation of their functions in vivo and help in the treatment of genetic diseases.

Author: Thomas Carell, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Germany), http://www.cup.uni-muenchen.de/oc/carell/

Title: Efficient Synthesis of Deazaguanosine-Derived tRNA Nucleosides PreQ0, PreQ1, and Archaeosine Using the Turbo-Grignard Method

European Journal of Organic Chemistry, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejoc.201000987

Thomas Carell | Wiley-VCH
Further information:
http://www.cup.uni-muenchen.de/oc/carell/
http://www.wiley-vch.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein
24.01.2017 | Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY

nachricht Choreographing the microRNA-target dance
24.01.2017 | UT Southwestern Medical Center

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>