Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Reversible Wound Closure

28.11.2013
Dissolvable dendritic thioester hydrogel for sealing wounds

In first-aid situations, wounds must be quickly and effectively closed to stop blood loss and prevent infection. For treatment on arrival in a hospital, the temporary seal must be reopened, which often causes additional damage to the injured tissue. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists have now introduced a novel gel for sealing wounds. The gel can later be dissolved and gently removed.



Injuries sustained in remote areas, far from civilization, or in military action can often not be treated in a clinic until hours later. In such scenarios, a temporary wound closure system is desirable. Such a system should: 1) stop the bleeding for several hours, 2) adhere to the tissue, 3) be easy to apply, and 4) be easily removable in a controlled manner to make the wound accessible during surgical treatment. No single wound-closure systems currently available meet all of these requirements. Removal of blood-clotting agents or dressings requires tearing or surgical excision, both of which can increase the size of the wound and make it worse.

Scientists working at Boston University and the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston have now developed a wound-closure system based on a synthetic biocompatible gel that meets the requirements listed above. The gel is cross-linked through branched thioesters. The team, led by Mark W. Grinstaff, uses a chemical reaction known as thiol–thioester exchange in order to dissolve these gels for removal.

In this reaction, a thioester bond reacts with a thiolate anion to produce new thioester and thiolate products. The advantage of this reaction is that it takes place in an aqueous environment under physiological conditions. This type of reaction also occurs in natural biological processes. When the thioester gel is treated with cysteine methyl ester, the thioester bridges are rapidly split and the gel dissolves.

Wounds may be treated by simply mixing and applying two starting materials. The gel forms within seconds, adheres to the skin even when stress is applied and remains intact for several days. The gel absorbs any liquid exiting the wound. Treatment with cysteine methyl ester causes the wound closure to reopen within 30 minutes. To simulate injury to a vein, the researchers filled a section of bovine jugular vein with buffer solution and punctured it. Once the gel was applied, the damaged vein was completely sealed; after dissolution of the gel, the buffer solution flowed out again.

About the Author
Dr. Mark W. Grinstaff is Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemistry at Boston University and a College of Engineering Distinguished Faculty Fellow. His main interests are in the synthesis of new polymers and materials, and their application in medicine. He recently received the Edward M. Kennedy Award for Healthcare Innovation and was named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.
Author: Mark W. Grinstaff, Boston University (USA), http://people.bu.edu/mgrin/
Title: A Dendritic Thioester Hydrogel Based on Thiol–Thioester Exchange as a Dissolvable Sealant System for Wound Closure

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201308007

Mark W. Grinstaff | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Study suggests oysters offer hot spot for reducing nutrient pollution
17.10.2017 | Virginia Institute of Marine Science

nachricht World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic molecules
17.10.2017 | CNRS

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Study suggests oysters offer hot spot for reducing nutrient pollution

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

17.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic molecules

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>