Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Key Found to Kill Cystic Fibrosis Superbug

25.04.2007
Researchers from the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario , working with a group from Edinburgh, have discovered a way to kill the cystic fibrosis superbug, Burkholderia cenocepacia.

These investigators, under the leadership of Dr. Miguel Valvano, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, have had their research published in the May issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, and highlighted in Nature Reviews/Microbiology.

B. cenocepacia is a multi-drug resistant microorganism that lives in damp or wet places and causes rot in plants such as onions. While it rarely causes infection in healthy people, it can be fatal for people with cystic fibrosis (CF), an inherited disease where the lungs become clogged with thick mucus, often leading to chronic respiratory infections.

The team of researchers has identified a weakness in the armour that protects the B. cenocepacia bacterium from the effects of antibiotics. They hypothesize that preventing the synthesis of a key sugar required for this armour, 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose (Ara4N), may lead to a susceptibility within the cell membrane to antibiotics.

... more about:
»antibiotic »cystic »fibrosis

"We are very excited with these findings, as they will let us come up with novel molecules to disrupt the making of Ara4N," says Valvano. "These molecules could then be tested as novel antibiotics." Valvano is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, a Canada Research Chair in Infectious Diseases and Microbial Pathogenesis, and leader of the Infectious Diseases Research Group at the Siebens-Drake Research Institute. He is available for interviews.

The research was funded through the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). "We're delighted by this news," says Cathleen Morrison, CEO of the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. "The possibility of a life-saving antibiotic to fight B. cenocepacia is tremendously encouraging to adults and children who have cystic fibrosis."

Dr. Bhagirath Singh, Scientific Director of the CIHR Institute of Infection and Immunity, says "This discovery provides new hope for the eradication of these bugs from cystic fibrosis patients and to improve their quality of life by developing new treatments."

Contacts:
Kathy Wallis,
Media Relations Officer, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry
The University of Western Ontario,
519-661-2111 Ext. 81136, Kathy.wallis@schulich.uwo.ca
Sagal Ali
Media Relations Officer
Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
1-800-378-2233 ext. 290
sali@cysticfibrosis.ca
David Coulombe
CIHR Media Specialist
Office: 613-941-4563
Mobile: 613-808-7526
mediarelations@cihr-irsc.gc.ca

Kathy Wallis | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.cysticfibrosis.ca
http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca

Further reports about: antibiotic cystic fibrosis

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Strange undertakings: ant queens bury dead to prevent disease
13.10.2017 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

nachricht Cell contacts in embryonic development determine cellular fate
13.10.2017 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

Im Focus: Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere

Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers.

Recent modeling along with previously published results from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft -- short for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and...

Im Focus: Austrian and Chinese Academies of Sciences successfully conducted first Inter-Continental Quantum Video Call

The two Academy presidents Chunli Bai and Anton Zeilinger tested quantum encrypted communication between Beijing and Vienna in a live-experiment. The quantum key was transmitted via the Chinese quantum satellite Micius.

From quantum cryptography to the quantum internet – fundamental research into the world of the quantum promises several new tech opportunities in the future....

Im Focus: Entangling photons from a quantum dot in the telecom C-band

A research team of the institute of semiconductor optics and functional interfaces (IHFG) of the University of Stuttgart experimentally verified the generation of polarization-entangled photon pairs in the emission wavelength range of the telecom C-band. The generation of entangled photons, i.e. a non-classical phenomenon which “bounds” the states of two different entities, is a cornerstone for the realization of quantum networks.

Quantum dots are one of the most prominent and promising candidates as non-classical light sources applied in quantum information technology. They have been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

Conference Week RRR2017 on Renewable Resources from Wet and Rewetted Peatlands

28.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Cell contacts in embryonic development determine cellular fate

13.10.2017 | Life Sciences

The Far Side of the Milky Way

13.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Strange undertakings: ant queens bury dead to prevent disease

13.10.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>