Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Experimental immunusuppressant drug preserves transplanted kidneys, avoids toxic side effects

25.08.2005


An international team of transplant physicians has shown that the investigational drug belatacept (LEA29Y) preserves transplanted kidney function as effectively as cyclosporine, the drug most commonly used to prevent the immune system from rejecting transplanted organs. At the same time, belatacept avoids many of the toxic side effects that adversely affect kidney function, blood pressure and cholesterol levels of patients undergoing long-term anti-rejection therapy with immunosuppressant drugs.

The findings from a Phase II clinical trial of belatacept, conducted in 218 patients at 22 centers in the U.S., Canada and Europe between March 2001 and December 2003, are published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Christian P. Larsen, MD, PhD, director of the Emory Transplant Center and professor of surgery at Emory University School of Medicine, and Flavio Vincenti, MD, of the University of California, San Francisco, are co-lead authors of the article.

"The results of this study on the safety and effectiveness of belatacept were as good as we could hope for from the first trial of this new class of drugs in human transplant recipients," Dr. Larsen said. "This arguably is among the most important new classes of immunosuppressive drugs to be evaluated since cyclosporine was introduced more than 20 years ago."



More than 23,000 organ transplants are performed each year in the United States. While current immunosuppressant medications have reduced the incidence of early organ failure following transplants, measures to prevent late failure and to halt other diseases that result from toxic side effects of current treatments have been limited.

Study participants were randomly assigned to receive an intensive or less intensive regimen of belatacept or cyclosporine, in addition to several other drugs that are part of standard immunosuppressive therapy. At six months following transplant the incidence of clinically suspected and biopsy proven acute rejection of transplanted kidneys was similar and not statistically significant among the groups: 6-7 percent of belatacept patients had acute rejection compared to 8 percent of patients receiving cyclosporine. The function of the transplanted kidneys of both groups of patients receiving belatacept was significantly better than in patients receiving cyclosporine. Lipid levels and blood pressure were similar or slightly lower in the belatacept groups, despite greater use of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medications in the cyclosporine group.

Although kidney transplants are the current standard of care for patients with end-stage renal disease, the immune system’s hostile response to a foreign organ sets off a chain of events that can damage and cause rejection of the transplanted organ. Cyclosporine, the current standard of care following organ transplantation, has shown excellent results in preventing rejection over the short term. Cyclosporine prevents initial organ rejection by effectively blocking certain immune system pathways that are activated when the body detects foreign cells. At the same time, however, cyclosporine indiscriminately blocks other cellular signal pathways, causing serious side effects such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, which may lead to cardiovascular disease and kidney toxicity that ultimately leads to renal failure. In addition, long-term cyclosporine use damages the body’s immune system and prevents it from fighting off other infections following transplant.

Belatacept, on the other hand, prevents T-cell activation by selectively blocking one of two signals needed for T-cells to become fully activated and to initiate an immune response against a transplanted organ. Selectively blocking this co-stimulatory signal prevents organ rejection while allowing the body to continue fighting other infections.

Preclinical research conducted with nonhuman primates at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory University also showed belatacept was equally as effective as cyclosporine in preventing rejection of kidney transplants while avoiding toxic side effects. The primate research was an important step in establishing human clinical trials to develop an effective alternative to current anti-rejection therapies.

The data from the primate studies and the current clinical trial have formed the basis of a similar international Phase III study of belatacept and kidney transplants as well as exploratory studies using belatacept that avoids both cyclosporine and steroids and a study of islet transplants using belatacept in place of cyclosporine.

Holly Korschun | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.emory.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Immune Defense Without Collateral Damage
23.01.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>