Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Premature births from inflammation and infection rapidly detected by proteomics technology

07.02.2005


A combination of four proteins that result from inflammation and infection and lead to premature birth can be rapidly and accurately detected in the amniotic fluid of pregnant women using proteomics technology, Yale researchers report in two studies in the February issue of British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.



Using proteomics science, the Yale team, in collaboration with two other academic institutions, developed a novel method called MR scoring to discriminate healthy from diseased women in whom preterm delivery is impending and the health of the fetus is in danger. MR scoring relies on identification of a group of proteins that serve as biomarkers characteristic to women who will deliver preterm. The proteins detected are Human neutrophil defensin 1, Human neutrophil defensin 2, Calgranulin C and Calgranulin A.

"We are probably at a turning point in the history of preterm labor diagnosis," said Irina Buhimschi, M.D., research scientist in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences. "While many proteins are present in the amniotic fluid, not all are biomarkers with diagnostic significance."


About 50 percent of women who deliver prematurely have evidence of inflammation in the amniotic fluid. In the current study, Buhimschi and co-authors analyzed stored samples of amniotic fluid from 107 women, some diagnosed with rupture of the membranes or twins and eventually delivered prematurely. The sensitivity and specificity of the MR score in identifying women who had infection and inflammation and delivered earlier reached 100 percent. The four biomarkers are necessary and sufficient to separate between sick and healthy patients.

Buhimschi said the current "gold standard" for infection consists of amniotic fluid culture, which takes days to obtain results. A proteomic diagnostic test for infection and inflammation could probably be performed much faster than the current available laboratory tests. Other current tests have poor sensitivity and specificity and are not available in time for rapid clinical decisions.

The team will present another clinical application of their research (cervical incompetence) during the Plenary Session in February at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine in Reno, Nevada. Other authors include Catalin Buhimschi, M.D. of Yale, Rob Christner of Ciphergen Biosystems and Carl P. Weiner of University of Maryland. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and Ciphergen Biosystems.

Karen N. Peart | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.yale.edu

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signals

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

The “Holy Grail” of peptide chemistry: Making peptide active agents available orally

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>