Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sponge substance works well with yew derivative to thwart cancer cell proliferation

15.07.2004


A drug derived from an ocean-growing sponge teams up to enhance the performance of the yew tree derivative Taxol® (paclitaxel) in preventing the growth of cancer cells, according to research published in the July 15 issue of the journal Cancer Research. Indeed, discodermolide, a novel drug isolated from the marine sponge Discodermia dissoluta, works with paclitaxel to thwart tumor cell growth--with several times the efficacy that either drug alone exerts on proliferating cancer cells.

Studies by Mary Ann Jordan, Ph.D., a scientist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an international team of cancer researchers including postdoctoral fellows Stephane Honore, Ph.D., and Kathryn Kamath, Ph.D., demonstrate that the combination of the two drugs inhibited proliferation of human lung cancer cells by 41 percent. Administered alone, either discodermolide or paclitaxel prevented the cancer cell growth by only 9.6 or 16 percent, respectively. The drugs also combined to induce programmed cell death, or apoptosis, in the lung cancer cells.

"Our results indicate that Taxol® and discodermolide have the potential to improve cancer patients’ responses and reduce undesirable side effects when the two drugs are administered together," Jordan said.



The drugs, which stem from naturally occurring sources, work in concert to stabilize the assembly/disassembly process of microtubules in cells. Microtubules--lengthy polymers made up of protein bundles, called tubulin--form long, straw-like cylinders that help shape the skeletal structure within cells and also move cellular components within the cell, including vesicles, granules, organelles like mitochondria, and chromosomes. Their attachment with chromosomes, the DNA genetic material in cells, is critical for cell replication and growth. Microtubules normally exist in a state of dynamic instability, where the polymers grow rapidly--longer or shorter, depending on the need of the cells.

In this study, discodermolide and paclitaxel combined to alter the overall microtubule dynamics by 71 percent when administered together. Alone, they each reduced microtubule dynamic instability by 24 percent.

By altering the stability dynamics of microtubules, paclitaxel and discodermolide limit cancer cells ability to duplicate DNA and divide. The cells are stuck in a pre-division stage of the cell cycle called G2/M. Cancer cells that are restricted to the pre-division stage of the cell cycle cannot divide and ultimately die, thus reducing proliferation of tumor cells.

Both drugs work by binding to the microtubules. Because of their lengthy structure and the number of drug binding sites normally associated with them, microtubules are unique receptors for drugs within cells.

Paclitaxel is currently an approved therapeutic for control of cancer growth. Discodermolide is currently under study in phase one clinical studies.

Jordan is an adjunct professor and research biologist in the Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology department, University of California, Santa Barbara. In the paclitaxel/discodermolide studies, she collaborated with researchers from the Universite de la Mediterranee, Marseille, France; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y.; and the University of California, Santa Barbara, Calif. The work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

Russell Vanderboom | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aacr.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>