Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers find smallpox drug may also target adenovirus

20.05.2008
1 cause of the common cold, adenovirus also causes death in organ transplant recipients

Scientists at Saint Louis University have made two key discoveries that could lead to the first-ever human testing of a drug to target the adenovirus, which causes a number of severe upper-respiratory infections and is one of many viruses that causes the common cold.

There are currently no drugs approved specifically to treat adenovirus infections in large part because there has been no animal model in which to test drug candidates, a key prerequisite before testing in humans.

SLU researchers and their collaborators, however, have made two breakthrough findings: an animal model suitable for adenovirus testing – in this case using Syrian hamsters – and a drug that successfully attacks the adenovirus in those animals. The drug, hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir or CMX001, is currently under development by Chimerix, Inc. as a biodefense agent to meet the threat of smallpox or monkeypox viruses and as an antiviral agent in transplant patients.

... more about:
»Adenovirus »CMX001 »SLU »Testing »replicate »smallpox

The SLU research is published the week of May 19 in an early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“This is exciting news and a major step forward in finding a drug to treat adenovirus infections in humans,” said William Wold, Ph.D., professor and chair of the department of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine and the study’s lead author.

One of the key obstacles to finding an animal model for adenovirus testing involves the fact that the virus is generally species-specific; meaning the human version of the virus doesn’t replicate well in animals commonly used in laboratory research.

The SLU researchers, however, found that the adenovirus replicates in Syrian hamsters (also called golden hamsters) with suppressed immune systems in much the same manner as it replicates in humans whose immune systems are weakened – making Syrian hamsters ideal for animal model testing.

“We are pleased to see that CMX001, a drug candidate showing broad antiviral activity that is being developed under a federal grant for smallpox, also has potential benefit against adenovirus,” said George R. Painter, Ph.D., president and CEO of Chimerix.

Said Samuel Stanley Jr., director of the Midwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research (MRCE): “It is exciting to see work funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ MRCE program lead to potential new therapies for this important virus.”

There are 52 known serotypes, or strains, of adenovirus in humans. They generally cause acute upper respiratory infections including colds, tonsillitis and ear infections, but they can also cause conjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and bladder infections.

Most people are able to recover from an adenovirus infection, but in some young children and people with weakened immune systems, adenovirus infections can turn virulent and even deadly. Adenovirus can also cause disease and even death in organ transplant recipients. Severe adenovirus outbreaks have occurred among groups of military recruits likely due to crowded living conditions.

CMX001 is an oral pro-drug, or derivative, of cidofovir, a drug developed by Gilead Sciences, Inc. to treat a type of retinitis in AIDS patients. Chimerix licensed from Gilead the rights to develop CMX001.

Cidofovir has long been a possible candidate to treat a number of virus infections, including the herpes virus, poxvirus and adenovirus infections in humans. The drug, however, is quite toxic to the liver and kidneys and is not available in oral form, which limits widespread use.

Using the new animal model, the SLU researchers found that CMX001 provided protection from the adenovirus when it was administered prophylactically (before infection with the virus) or therapeutically (after infection). The scientists found that the drug worked by greatly reducing the ability of the virus to replicate in key organs, mostly notably the liver.

The SLU team also found that CMX001 was much less toxic and far more powerful than cidofovir. In addition, scientists discovered, two weeks after infection with the virus CMX001 had reduced the viral load in the liver and blood to undetectable levels.

Nancy Solomon | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.slu.edu
http://www.chimerix-inc.com

Further reports about: Adenovirus CMX001 SLU Testing replicate smallpox

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Decoding the genome's cryptic language
27.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>