Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A genetic cause for iron deficiency

15.04.2008
Rare syndrome may provide general insight into iron deficiency, and suggests new treatments for iron disorders

The discovery of a gene for a rare form of inherited iron deficiency may provide clues to iron deficiency in the general population – particularly iron deficiency that doesn’t respond to iron supplements - and suggests a new treatment approach. The finding was published online by the journal Nature Genetics on April 13.

Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in the United States.(1) Most cases are easily reversed with oral iron supplements, but over the years, Mark Fleming, MD, DPhil, interim Pathologist-in-Chief at Children’s Hospital Boston, and pediatric hematologist Nancy Andrews, MD, PhD, formerly of Children’s and now Dean of Duke University School of Medicine, had been referred a number of children with iron deficiency anemia who didn’t respond to oral supplements, and only poorly to intravenous iron.

The cause of their condition – termed iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) –was a mystery. The children all had good diets, and none had any condition that might interfere with iron absorption or cause chronic blood loss, the most common causes of iron deficiency. All had evidence of anemia from a very early age, and many also had siblings with iron deficiency anemia. Seeing reports of several similarly afflicted families in the medical literature, Fleming and Andrews were convinced that genetics was a factor.

“After nearly 15 years, we finally had enough families that we could begin to think about positionally cloning the gene for the disorder,” says Fleming.

Fleming and Andrews, experts in iron metabolism, and their colleagues Karin Finberg, MD, PhD, and Matthew Heeney, MD, studied five extended families with more than one chronically iron-deficient member. They found a variety of mutations in a gene called TMPRSS6 (the acronym stands for transmembrane serine protease S6) in all of these families, as well as several patients without a family history of the disorder.

Although IRIDA is quite rare, the authors believe it might be the extreme end of a broad continuum of disease, since TMPRSS6 mutations varied widely in the five families and caused different degrees of iron deficiency and anemia.

“Our observations suggest that more common forms of iron deficiency anemia may have a genetic component,” says Andrews.

All patients in the study apparently had recessive mutations, since their parents did not have iron deficiency anemia. The investigators now want to determine whether people with just a single abnormal copy of TMPRSS6 have subtler alterations in iron absorption that might not otherwise have come to the attention of a hematologist.

Although the mechanism is still unknown, deficiency of the TMPRSS6 protein causes the body to produce too much hepcidin, a hormone that inhibits iron absorption by the intestine. Normally, hepcidin is produced to protect the body against iron overload – but patients with IRIDA make large amounts of hepcidin even though they are iron deficient. “People with this disorder make too much hepcidin, putting the brakes on iron absorption inappropriately,” Fleming says.

In addition, patients with TMPRSS6 mutations cannot make new red blood cells efficiently because the iron needed to make them comes from macrophages, and hepcidin causes macrophages to hold on to iron. This explains the patients’ poor response to intravenous iron – the iron is trapped in macrophages and cannot be used for red blood cell production.

The fact that TMPRSS6 regulates hepcidin may open up new avenues for therapy, the researchers say. For example, blocking TMPRSS6 may help patients with iron overload disorders make more hepcidin in order to limit intestinal iron absorption. Conversely, stimulating TMPRSS6 may have therapeutic benefit in certain patients with anemia, particularly those in which hepcidin is overproduced.

Jaime Crespo | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.childrens.harvard.edu
http://www.childrenshospital.org/newsroom

Further reports about: Andrews Genetic Hepcidin TMPRSS6 anemia deficiency disorder mutations

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht What happens in the cell nucleus after fertilization
06.12.2016 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”
05.12.2016 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Simple processing technique could cut cost of organic PV and wearable electronics

06.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

3-D printed kidney phantoms aid nuclear medicine dosing calibration

06.12.2016 | Medical Engineering

Robot on demand: Mobile machining of aircraft components with high precision

06.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>