Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The Link between Blood Flow and Dementia

02.08.2011
Dr. Gabor Petzold begins work as Research Group Leader at the DZNE and Senior Physician at the University Hospital of Bonn

High blood pressure is a typical risk factor for dementia. Why is that? What is the relationship between blood flow and dementia? These are the questions that Dr. Gabor Petzold is investigating at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Bonn. He is also Senior Physician at the Clinic for Neurology, where he is responsible for the outpatient clinic for vascular diseases.

Each brain activity consumes oxygen, which is carried by the blood to the brain. The blood flow is carefully regulated: When activity increases in a brain region there is a corresponding increase in blood flow in the same region. Impaired regulation of blood flow may lead to vascular dementia – a disease mainly characterized by slowing of mental activity. A relationship between cerebral blood flow and disease can be observed in other dementias as well. Petzold will examine these correlations in vascular dementia, in CADASIL (a congenital vascular disease), in symptoms of dementia following stroke, and in Alzheimer’s disease.

Petzold’s work has already provided some new insights into the cellular and molecular bases of the neural regulation of blood flow. For instance, he has shown the importance of astrocytes in the regulation mechanism. Astrocytes are cells that enclose blood vessels and are in contact with synapses, whose signals they transmit to the blood vessels. In Alzheimer’s patients, the signaling pathway regulating blood flow may be impaired. Although the cause of Alzheimer’s disease is considered to be abnormal protein deposition in the brain, impaired blood flow is assumed to accelerate the progress of the disease. Investigations have revealed that impaired cerebral blood flow occurs early on, before the symptoms of the disease appear. Timely intervention could hence delay the progress of the disease.

The exact molecular causes of vascular dementia or symptoms of dementia following a stroke are still unknown. Using highly sophisticated imaging technologies, which allow the observation of cells in vivo, Petzold and his research team plan to examine these diseases more closely with adequate models, thus hoping to obtain clues to potential new treatments. Another aim of the group is to develop new clinical therapies and diagnostics based on their research findings.

Petzold completed his specialization in neurology at the Charité University Hospital in Berlin. From 2005 to 2008 he conducted research at Harvard University; afterward he returned to the Charité, where he worked mainly as a physician. In Bonn, Petzold will divide his time between the lab and the clinic, and in this double capacity build a bridge between research and patient care.

Contact information:
Dr. Gabor Petzold
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
Biomedizinisches Zentrum (BMZ), UKB
Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25
53127 Bonn
Phone: +49 (0) 228 287 51606
Email: gabor.petzold@dzne.de
Dr. Katrin Weigmann
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
Press- und Public Relations
Holbeinstraße 13-15
53175 Bonn
Phone: +49 (0) 228 43302 263
Mobile: +49 (0) 173 - 5471350
Email: katrin.weigmann@dzne.de

Katrin Weigmann | idw
Further information:
http://www.dzne.de/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The world's tiniest first responders
21.06.2018 | University of Southern California

nachricht A new toxin in Cholera bacteria discovered by scientists in Umeå
21.06.2018 | Schwedischer Forschungsrat - The Swedish Research Council

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

What are the effects of coral reef marine protected areas?

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences

The Janus head of the South Asian monsoon

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>