Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The genome of diamondback moth provides new clues for sustainable pest management

14.01.2013
Study published online today in Nature Genetics
January 13, 2013, Fujian and Shenzhen, China- An international research consortium, led by Fujian Agriculture, Forestry University (FAFU) and BGI, has completed the first genome sequence of the diamondback moth (DBM), the most destructive pest of brassica crops. This work provides wider insights into insect adaptation to host plant and opens new ways for more sustainable pest management. The latest study was published online today in Nature Genetics.

The diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) preferentially feeds on economically important food crops such as rapeseed, cauliflower and cabbage. It has developed resistance to against more than 50 insecticides, including DDT, Bt toxins, among others, making the use of chemicals as a control measurement become ineffective. It is estimated that the total cost associated with the damage and management is US$4-5 billion per year worldwide.

"The completed genome sequencing of DBM will lay a solid foundation for tracking the evolutionary mechanisms of how an insect evolves to become a successful herbivore that can defense many insecticides." said Professor Minsheng You, Vice President of FAFU and leader of the research team. "The work here also provides an invaluable resource for scientists to better understand the reasons why DBM is such a serious pest and how new strategies can be developed to control insect pests."

In this study, researchers sequenced the genome of DBM by whole genome shotgun (WGS) and fosmid clones technologies, yielding ~343 Mb draft genome with 18,071 predicted protein-coding genes. Compared with other sequenced insect species, they found that the diamondback moth possesses a relatively larger set of genes and a moderate number of gene families, suggesting the expansion of certain gene families. Additionally, the genome-based phylogeny demonstrated that DBM was a basal lepidopteran species, which is well supported by its modal karyotype.

Based on the genomic data generated from ~1,000 male pupae, researchers identified the genome-wide level of polymorphism within the sequenced DBM strain (Fuzhou-S), which may lay the genetic bases for DBM in adapting to various environmental challenges. They investigated a set of genes preferentially expressed at the larval stage that contribute to odorant chemoreception, food digestion and metabolic detoxification. Interestingly, they found that the co-expression of sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) and glucosinolate sulfatase (GSS) genes may be crucial for DBM to become a successful cruciferous herbivore.

Insecticide tolerance or resistance may have contribution to the option of detoxification pathway in insect herbivores. In this study, researchers found DBM has a larger set of insecticide resistance-related genes than silkworm (B. mori) that had little exposure to insecticide over 5,000 years of domestication. They identified in DBM obvious gene duplications of four gene families that participated in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, including ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter families, the P450 monooxygenases (P450s), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and carboxylesterase (COEs). Notably, the further analysis highlighted the potential role of ABC transporters in detoxification.

The clever evolutionary trick has allowed DBM to become such a serious pest, and it may play an important role in the development of its ability to detoxify a wide range of chemicals. "Remarkably, it appears that the very genetic adaptations that allow DBM to detoxify the chemicals in its food plants, and also allow it to develop immunity to the insecticides used against it." commented by Professor Geoff Gurr of Charles Sturt University, Australia, one of the international collaborators.

Professor Jun Wang, Executive Director of BGI, said, "The availability of a reference genome for a species is extremely important in the deeper understanding of its biology and evolution. We are pleased to be part of this consortium and have the first publicly accessible database of diamondback moth genome. I expect we could translate our achievements into real actions for sustainable pest management in the near future."

The complete genome sequence of diamondback moth is publicly available via visit: http://www.iae.fafu.edu.cn/DBM.

About Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University

Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University (FAFU) is a major higher education institution in Fujian province, China. Its history can be traced back to Agricultural Department of Fukien Christian College founded in 1936 and Fujian Provincial Agriculture College founded in 1940. With its beautiful, environmentally-friendly campus, the University has been honored as one of China's model organizations of spiritual civilization, one of China's model "green" employers and one of China's most employee-friendly organizations.

FAFU has established teaching and research collaborations with universities and research institutions in more than 20 countries and regions. Based on its long history, highly qualified faculty and full range of professional disciplines, the University has established scholarships and enrolled students from Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan and foreign countries. By adhering to the university motto of Excellent Virtue, Honest Wisdom, Profound Knowledge and Constant Innovation, FAFU is striving to promote its open education and international cooperation and exchange to further enhance its national and international recognition as an outstanding institution for academic excellence and economic development.

Learn more information about FAFU, please visit http://www.fafu.edu.cn/english/index.html.

About BGI

BGI was founded in 1999 with the mission of being a premier scientific partner to the global research community. The goal of BGI is to make leading-edge genomic science highly accessible through its investment in infrastructure that leverages the best available technology, economies of scale, and expert bioinformatics resources. BGI, which includes both private non-profit genomic research institutes and sequencing application commercial units, and its affiliates, BGI Americas, headquartered in Cambridge, MA, and BGI Europe, headquartered in Copenhagen, Denmark, have established partnerships and collaborations with leading academic and government research institutions as well as global biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, supporting a variety of disease, agricultural, environmental, and related applications.

BGI has established a proven track record of excellence, delivering results with high efficiency and accuracy for innovative, high-profile research which has generated over 250 publications in top-tier journals such as Nature and Science. These accomplishments include sequencing one percent of the human genome for the International Human Genome Project, contributing 10 percent to the International Human HapMap Project, carrying out research to combat SARS and German deadly E. coli, playing a key role in the Sino-British Chicken Genome Project, and completing the sequence of the rice genome, the silkworm genome, the first Asian diploid genome, the potato genome, and, most recently, have sequenced the human Gut metagenome, and a significant proportion of the genomes for 1,000 genomes. For more information about BGI please visit www.genomics.cn or www.bgiamericas.com.

Media Contact:
Minsheng You
Vice President
Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University
86-591-8379-3035
msyou@iae.fjau.edu.cn
www.fafu.edu.cn
Bicheng Yang
Public Communication Officer
BGI
86-755-8263-9701
yangbicheng@genomics.cn

Jia Liu | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.genomics.cn
http://www.bgiamericas.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cnidarians remotely control bacteria
21.09.2017 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

nachricht Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes
21.09.2017 | NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary

21.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cnidarians remotely control bacteria

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>