Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

DNA editing tool flips its target

05.09.2008
Imagine having to copy an entire book by hand without missing a comma. Our cells face a similar task every time they divide. They must duplicate both their DNA and a subtle pattern of punctuation-like modifications on the DNA known as methylation.

Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have caught in action one of the tools mammalian cells use to maintain their pattern of methylation. Visualized by X-ray crystallography, the SRA domain of the protein UHRF1 appears to act like a bookmark while enzymes are copying a molecule of DNA.

The team's description of the protein's structure while bound to DNA is published this week in Nature.

Scientists refer to methylation, the addition of a methyl group to DNA, as an "epigenetic" modification because it adds a layer of information on top of the genetic sequence of the DNA itself. It marks genes for silencing, which means they do not manufacture proteins.

"The processes that copy the methylation pattern have to be faithful," says senior author Xiaodong Cheng, PhD, professor of biochemistry and a Georgia Research Alliance eminent scholar. "Otherwise, losing DNA methylation marks can have serious consequences, causing genes to become active at the wrong places and times."

"Gene silencing via DNA methylation is critical for normal development and for curbing the runaway cell division that characterizes cancer," said Peter Preusch, PhD, who oversees biophysics grants at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health. "Alterations in methylation patterns are also important for generating embryonic stem-like cells from differentiated cells."

In mammalian cells, methylation usually appears on double stranded DNA where the nucleotide Cytosine (C) is followed by Guanine (G). The complementary sequence on the opposite strand is also C then G, and the methylation appears on both Cs.

When a cell is copying its DNA, a set of enzymes duplicates the DNA sequence from the parental strand to the new "daughter" strand but not the methylation. Each new daughter strand of the DNA molecule is left with the previously methylated Cs unmethylated. UHRF1 recognizes this "hemi-methylated" DNA and calls in a methyltransferase enzyme to add a second methyl group onto the daughter strand.

"UHRF1 has the important task of making sure the methyltransferase enzyme does its job in the right place and right time," Cheng says.

Mouse cells that have deleted the UHRF1 gene are more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents such as radiation, and mouse embryos without the gene cannot complete development. Other studies have found that cancer cells produce more UHRF1 than non-cancerous cells.

What was an unexpected finding was how the SRA domain of UHRF1 recognizes the hemi-methylated DNA, Cheng says. It flips the methylated nucleotide out of the DNA helix, which only had been seen previously in enzymes that physically modify the DNA.

Cheng says the flipping mechanism could prevent the protein from sliding away once it has found a hemi-methylated site.

"It suggests that it serves as a placeholder, where it recruits other enzymes for faithful DNA methylation or repair enzymes if the DNA has been damaged," he says.

Holly Korschun | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.emory.edu

Further reports about: DNA DNA sequence Enzym Molecule Protein Strand UHRF1 enzyme epigenetic hemi-methylated DNA methyl methylation

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Nesting aids make agricultural fields attractive for bees
20.07.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht The Kitchen Sponge – Breeding Ground for Germs
20.07.2017 | Hochschule Furtwangen

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

Leipzig HTP-Forum discusses "hydrothermal processes" as a key technology for a biobased economy

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers create new technique for manipulating polarization of terahertz radiation

20.07.2017 | Information Technology

High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing

20.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

First direct observation and measurement of ultra-fast moving vortices in superconductors

20.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>