Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Blocking receptor in key hormone fires up enzyme to kill pancreatic cancer cells

11.08.2011
Thomas Jefferson University research suggests a potential target—Angiotensin II type 2 receptor—for chemopreventive agents to fight pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have shown, for the first time, that blocking a receptor of a key hormone in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) reduces cancer cell growth by activating the enzyme AMPK to inhibit fatty acid synthase, the ingredients to support cell division.

With that, a new chemopreventive agent that inhibits the angiotensin II type 2 receptor—never before thought to play a role in tumor growth—could be developed to help treat one of the fastest-moving cancers that has a 5-year survival rate of only 5 percent.

Hwyda Arafat, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and the co-director of the Jefferson Pancreatic, Biliary and Related Cancers Center, and her fellow researchers, including the chair of the Department of Surgery at Jefferson, Charles J. Yeo, M.D., FACS, present their findings in the August issue of Surgery.

Angiotensin II (AngII) is the principal hormone in the RAS that regulates our blood pressure and water balance; it has two receptors: type 1 and type 2. AngII is also generated actively in the pancreas and has been shown to be involved in tumor angiogenesis.

Previous studies have pointed to the hormone's type 1 receptor as the culprit in cancer cell proliferation and tumor inflammation; however, the idea that type 2 had any effect was never entertained.

By looking at pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells in vitro, Jefferson researchers discovered that the type 2 receptor, not just type 1, mediates the production of fatty acid synthase (FAS), which has been shown to supply the cell wall ingredients necessary for cancer cells to multiply.

FAS was previously identified as a possible oncogene in the 1980s. It is up-regulated in breast cancers and is indicator of poor prognosis, and thus believed to be a worthwhile chemopreventive target.

"AngII is not just involved in cell inflammation and angiogenesis; it's involved in tumor metabolism as well," said Dr. Arafat, a member of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson. "It promotes FAS with both receptors, which makes the tumor grow."

"Blocking the type 2 receptor reduces PDA cell growth with the activation of AMPK, revealing a new mechanism by which chemoprevention can exploit," she added. "In fact, maybe combined blocking of the two receptors would be more efficient than just blocking one receptor."

AMPK, or adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, is the focus of several agents today, including ones for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. It is a master metabolic regulator for cells that is activated in times of reduced energy availability, like starvation. Activation of AMPK has been shown to improve energy homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure. The enzyme also activates a well-known tumor suppressor, p53.

"The main thing is activation of AMPK in tumor cells," said Dr. Arafat. "AMPK is the perfect candidate as it regulates multiple targets that both halt tumor cell division and activate programmed cell death. Although it is yet to be determined how the type 2 receptor imposes deregulation of AMPK activity, identification of the type 2 receptor as a novel target for therapy is very exciting"

Next, Dr. Arafat and fellow researchers are proposing to take this research into animal studies. They hope to target the receptors early on in the disease to better understand its prevention capabilities and also study its treatment potential. Considering pancreatic cancer is typically detected in later stages, finding better ways to treat cases that have progressed further along would be of great benefit to patients.

Thomas Jefferson University, the largest freestanding academic medical center in Philadelphia, is composed of Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies, Jefferson School of Population Health, Jefferson School of Health Professions, Jefferson School of Pharmacy, and Jefferson School of Nursing. Jefferson is regarded nationally as one of the best universities offering a range of comprehensive programs for the education of health professions. Thomas Jefferson University partners with Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, its education and clinical care affiliate.

Steve Graff | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jefferson.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Show me your leaves - Health check for urban trees
12.12.2017 | Gesellschaft für Ökologie e.V.

nachricht Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation
12.12.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>