Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Supercomputer Rankings for "Big Data" Machines Released

17.11.2011
The list of supercomputers entered in the Graph500 competition now features 50 competitors, up from nine in its initial release a year ago, said Sandia National Laboratories researcher Richard Murphy, chair of the Graph500 steering committee.

New rankings were released Tuesday in Seattle at SC2011, the international conference for high-performance computing.

NNSA/SC Blue Gene/Q Prototype II has risen to the top spot on the list and is the first National Nuclear Security Administration winner. Sandia’s Ultraviolet platform placed 10th using custom software, the Sandia Red Sky supercomputer dropped from 8th to 13th, and Dingus and Wingus, the insouciantly named Sandia prototype (Convey-based Field-Programmable Gate Array, or FPGA) platforms, placed 23rd and 24th, respectively.

The Graph500 stresses supercomputer performance on “big data” scaling problems rather than on the purely arithmetic computations measured by the Linpack Top500 and similar benchmarks. Graph500 machines are tested for their ability to solve complex problems involving random-appearing graphs, rather than simply for their speed in solving complex problems.

Such graph-based problems are found in the medical world, where large numbers of medical entries must be correlated; in the analysis of social networks, with their enormous numbers of electronically related participants; and in international security, where, for example, huge numbers of containers on ships roaming the world’s ports of call must be tracked.

“Companies are interested in doing well on the Graph500 because large-scale data analytics are an increasingly important problem area and could eclipse traditional high-performance computing (HPC) in overall importance to society,” said Murphy, whose committee receives input from 30 international researchers. Changes are implemented by Sandia, the Georgia Institute of Technology, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Indiana University and others.

Big-data problems are solved by creating large, complex graphs with vertices that represent the data points — say, people on Facebook — and edges that represent relations between the data points — say, friends on Facebook. These problems stress the ability of computing systems to store and communicate large amounts of data in irregular, fast-changing communication patterns, rather than the ability to perform many arithmetic operations in succession. The Graph500 benchmarks indicate how well supercomputers handle such complex problems.

The complete list of rankings is available at http://www.graph500.org/nov2011.html

Neal Singer | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.sandia.gov

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development
21.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Sensors embedded in sports equipment could provide real-time analytics to your smartphone
16.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>