Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

SENEKA Sensor network with mobile robots for disaster management

25.02.2014
This year again people are suffering from severe natural disasters. Where tidal waves, earthquakes or severe storms wreak havoc in towns, villages and agricultural land, peoples’ plight is always great. The key challenge in managing large-scale natural disasters is to provide rapid and comprehensive reconnaissance of the situation to facilitate a swift, targeted search for victims and identify access routes for emergency services.

This year again people are suffering from severe natural disasters. Where tidal waves, earthquakes or severe storms wreak havoc in towns, villages and agricultural land, peoples’ plight is always great. The key challenge in managing large-scale natural disasters is to provide rapid and comprehensive reconnaissance of the situation to facilitate a swift, targeted search for victims and identify access routes for emergency services.


The mobile ground surveillance and control station in a van and various ground robots (UGV) and airborne robots (UAV)

Fraunhofer IOSB 2014

Where industrial or facilities are affected, the area may be additionally contaminated by radioactivity or leaking toxins. Although a rapid rescue of victims is essential, sources of danger to the rescuer must also be detected as quickly as possible. Here networked robots and sensors can pay a valuable contribution.

State of the art

The conventional methods used in disaster management, which are characterized by human rescuers and dogs, fall increasingly short of being able to meet the complex requirements posed by such events. Initial experience during rescue work at the destroyed World Trade Center in New York proved that the use of robots and sensors results in a more efficient search for victims and sources of danger and relieves the emergency services.

For an efficient and effective disaster management, it is advisable to have several different robots and sensors on the ground and in the air enter the affected area. These communicate with each other over wireless connections, are equipped depending on the situation at hand and are dynamically networked with the rescue teams. The resulting division of labor and information exchange allows reconnaissance and rescue work to be conducted more rapidly. To date there are no practicable solutions on the market.

Networked unmanned aerial and ground vehicles support the rescue forces

For particularly large disaster areas, the SENEKA concept accelerates the situation assessment because the sensors and robots distributed across the area can interlink to form cooperative teams (swarm intelligence). The parallelization of tasks and the use of synergy effects (for example by combining local- and wide-area reconnaissance sensors) facilitate a faster, more targeted and situation-specific search for victims and hazards. One moving ground sensor platform (UGV), for example, can be accompanied by one airborne sensor platform (UAV), such as a quadrocopter. The aerial perspective of the UAV is helping the UGV to find its way and search for victims.

Using a staged disaster scenario, the SENEKA concept is already being tested.

The project consortium regulary assesses the functionality and performance of the SENEKA concept and prototype components under close consultation of important end users (THW and the fire departments of Mannheim and Berlin). In order to proof the functionality and performance of the SENEKA concept at the end of 2014 a comprehensive realistic use case will be employed at the test site of the Federal Office of Civil Protection and Disaster Assistance (BBK) in Ahrweiler.

The SENEKA project aims to pay a substantial contribution to closing the gap between research and practical usage with the new possibilities offered by the new information, sensor and robot technologies. The complementary skills and extensive experience of the participating Fraunhofer Institutes IOSB, IAIS, IIS, IPM, and IPA create a good basis for achieving the ambitious objectives of SENEKA.

Through targeted strategic investments an infrastructure (various UAV, UGV, mobile control centers,wireless s-net components, 2D/3D cameras, LIDAR, and navigation and hazardous material sensors) was created in advance, which further strengthens the success chances of the SENEKA project. With these resources the consortium has a unique basis for its planned ambitious project that is unique in Germany. Involved in the SENEKA projects are Fraunhofer Institutes Optronics, System Technologies and Image Exploitation IOSB in Karlsruhe (Project Management) and Ilmenau, Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA in Stuttgart, Intelligent Analysis and Information Systems IAIS in Sankt Augustin, Integrated Circuits IIS in Erlangen and Physical Measurement Techniques IPM in Freiburg.

At CeBIT Fraunhofer will present the SENEKA project at its stand in Hall 9.

Further information and images under:
http://www.iosb.fraunhofer.de/servlet/is/20222/

http://www.iosb.fraunhofer.de/servlet/is/43497/

Dipl.-Ing. Sibylle Wirth |

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Equipping form with function
23.06.2017 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

nachricht Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity
23.06.2017 | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>