Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

VBI and EML Research launch COPASI simulation software for modeling biochemical and systems biology networks

19.06.2006
EML Research and the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute (VBI) at Virginia Tech today announced the launch of the COPASI simulation software. COPASI (Complex Pathway Simulator) is a major software package that allows users to model, simulate and analyze biochemical and systems biology networks. COPASI, which supports the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) standard for systems biology software, enables researchers to investigate how a system is working by allowing them to construct biochemical models, reproduce experimental results and justify the validity of the chosen model.

The software may be freely downloaded at www.copasi.org for non-commercial purposes.

Pedro Mendes, Associate Professor at VBI, remarked: “The first official release of COPASI represents a key milestone in delivering a fully comprehensive software solution for modeling and simulation to the life science community.” He added: “We have been working closely with Ursula Kummer’s group at EML Research to deliver an open-source software package that aids in the understanding of cellular and molecular behavior and which facilitates the quantitative interpretation of modern experiments. COPASI is the culmination of six years of intense development work to deliver a package that meets the real needs of life scientists. The future development of COPASI will continue to strive towards providing a powerful package that every biologist can use, not just experts in systems biology.”

COPASI simplifies the task of model building by assisting the user in translating the language of chemistry (reactions) to mathematics (matrices and differential equations). The user-friendly interface is combined with a set of sophisticated numerical algorithms that assure the results are obtained quickly and accurately. COPASI simulates the kinetics of systems of biochemical reactions and provides a number of tools to fit models to data, optimize any function of the model, perform metabolic control analysis and linear stability analysis.

Dr. Ursula Kummer, Principal Investigator at EML Research, commented: “Simulation and modeling are becoming increasingly important tools in systems biology research and can be used to test the physical and chemical limitations as well as feasibility of a wide range of biochemical reactions. We anticipate that COPASI will prove invaluable to researchers not only in simulating increasingly complex networks but also in helping to understand how external factors, for example drugs, impact metabolic systems.” She added: “We have already seen many applications from our existing user community and expect many more due to COPASI’s inherent flexibility for top-down and bottom-up modeling.”

Sven Sahle | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eml-research.de
http://www.copasi.org

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Cutting edge research for the industries of tomorrow – DFKI and NICT expand cooperation
21.03.2017 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

nachricht Molecular motor-powered biocomputers
20.03.2017 | Technische Universität Dresden

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>