Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Improved Planning for the Evacuation of Buildings

04.02.2015

A simulation software from Siemens can analyze people's behavior in emergency situations. The software known as "Crowd Control" calculates how individuals or crowds will behave and move in emergencies. The program allows experts to observe and optimize evacuation and rescue measures in advance and in real time. Making such improvements is one of the most complex tasks that security officers have to perform.

Crowd Control can determine in advance how thousands of people will move, and it does so at a rate that is ten times faster than real life. This improves the planning of buildings and allows security personnel to be trained more easily. Siemens offers building evacuation simulations as an independent consulting service. This service encompasses the entire range of analytical tasks, extending from data collection and data preparation to the generation of reports and the interpretation of the results.

One of the reasons why it is so difficult to plan building evacuations in advance is that conditions change very quickly and dynamically during emergencies such as fires or shootings. In addition, it's hard to estimate how many people are actually present at an event and whether any of them fall into special categories (e.g. elderly, children, disabled). Moreover, passages can be blocked by objects and temporary construction sites can prevent people from using emergency exits.

The consultants from Siemens work together with the customers and their architects and planners to develop a variety of scenarios, for which they then use Crowd Control to calculate and visualize the resulting effects. Among other things, experts can take different types of people and blocked passages into account.

The algorithm, which was developed by Siemens' global research unit Corporate Technology, divides spaces into small virtual cells, each of which corresponds approximately to the space needed by a single human being. Force fields are used to define the behavior of empty and occupied cells.

Users can select person' starting points and destinations. Once the parameters are set, the model can run an emergency scenario that enables it to predict where dangerous situations would arise in the event of an evacuation under the postulated conditions.

Buildings can be made safer and before construction

Because the results can be viewed in 3D and in real time, the software can also be used as a training tool for demonstrating a variety of scenarios to security personnel. The consultants from Siemens also assist architects and security officers by using Crowd Control to analyze building plans. As a result, buildings can be made safer and more cost efficient before they are actually constructed.

Possible areas of application include airports, train stations, schools, shopping centers, and office buildings. In the case of airports and train stations in particular, simulations are the only feasible means of determining whether existing plans will be effective in an emergency. The experts from Siemens plan to further enhance Crowd Control in the future so that it can simulate other highly complex scenarios such as floods and explosions.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world
18.05.2017 | RMIT University

nachricht Internet of things made simple: One sensor package does work of many
11.05.2017 | Carnegie Mellon University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>