Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UC San Diego Researchers Participating in ‘Olympics of Science Conferences’ Feb. 18-22 in San Diego

22.02.2010
The future of stem cell research, how poor sleep influences drug use in adolescent social networks, understanding genome instability in cancer cells, and how computer science is being used to solve the nation’s most pressing health and environmental “grand challenges” are just a few of the topics that more than 20 UC San Diego researchers will discuss Feb. 18-22 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) at the San Diego Convention Center.

The AAAS meeting, America’s largest annual general scientific conference, is expected to draw as many as 8,000 attendees from 50 countries. The theme of this year’s meeting is bridging science and society, and will emphasize how the research of scientists and engineers is leading to improved medical treatments, better understanding of climate change, and technological advances that are improving the quality of life for humankind.

A global array of 3,000 free-drifting profiling floats that measures the temperature and salinity of the upper 2,000 meters of the ocean allows, for the first time, continuous monitoring of the temperature, salinity, and velocity of the upper ocean. All data from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s Argo project are being relayed and made publicly available within hours of collection. Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography

“UC San Diego’s unique environment encourages collaborative research across traditional academic departments, and it is at these intersections of disciplines where many new breakthroughs are being made,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Marye Anne Fox, co-chair of this year’s meeting with Qualcomm founder Irwin Jacobs. “At this important scientific conference, our researchers will explain how they’ve been able to translate their discoveries into real-world applications that improve society.”

Fox will join AAAS President Peter Agre at 10 a.m. Feb. 17 as guests on the popular KPBS radio talk show “These Days” hosted by Maureen Cavanaugh. They will discuss the importance of scientific and engineering research and scientific literacy to society.

A full schedule of talks, workshops, tours and news involving UC San Diego researchers at the conference can be found at http://research.ucsd.edu/aaasfeb2010/timeline.html

Two UC San Diego researchers will give important topical lectures:

* A Feb. 19 topical lecture by Steffanie Strathdee, associate dean of Global Health Sciences in the Department of Medicine at the UC San Diego School of Medicine, is titled “Infectious Diseases Have No Passport: Battling HIV, TB, and STDs on the Mexico-U.S. Border.” Strathdee, an infectious disease epidemiologist, has spent two decades focusing on HIV prevention in underserved, marginalized populations in developed and developing countries. Since 1994, she has published more than 325 peer-reviewed publications on HIV prevention and the natural history of HIV and related infections.

* A Feb. 21 topical lecture by Larry Goldstein, director of UC San Diego’s Stem Cell Research Program, professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and Howard Hughes Medical Investigator, is titled, “The Future of Stem Cell Research.” Goldstein is actively engaged in pursuing the promise of research with human embryonic stem cells, which are pliable, generic cells from the early embryo that scientists can convert into the body's specialized cells to study basic biological processes, disease, and organ regeneration. His research aims to help identify the cause of Alzheimer's disease and to better understand cancer and Huntington's disease.

The 287-million-pixel HIPerSpace wall at Calit2 UC San Diego is the highest-resolution display system in the world. Here, researchers analyze satellite images of Mongolia as part of a project to use non-invasive technologies to find the lost burial site of Genghis Khan. Photo by Erik Jepsen/Calit2.

Key individuals from the San Diego Science Festival, which include UC San Diego faculty members and staff, will participate in an AAAS workshop at 1:30 p.m., Feb. 19, which is designed to encourage participants to share experiences of successful science festivals, including those that have been held in San Diego, Cambridge, Mass., and St. Louis, Mo. The workshop will explore how science festivals may be helpful in extending the reach of informal science communication to more communities.

AAAS, in collaboration with the Birch Aquarium at Scripps, also is sponsoring a companion two-day conference at the aquarium Feb. 17-18. The meeting, Promoting Climate Literacy through Informal Science, will provide updates on climate research from top scientists in the world as well as discussions on improving public understanding of climate science and communicating with public audiences.

About 50 Journalists attending the AAAS meeting are also participating in a tour on Feb. 17 of research laboratories at UC San Diego and the nearby Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

For more information, go to http://research.ucsd.edu/aaasfeb2010/timeline.html

Rex Graham | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.ucsdnews.ucsd.edu

More articles from Event News:

nachricht International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open
20.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für ökologische Raumentwicklung e. V.

nachricht CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue
14.03.2017 | Universität Ulm

All articles from Event News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>