Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

As World Warms, Conservation Evolves

19.06.2012
Climate and Conservation offers a glimpse of climate change beyond images of melting Arctic ice—illustrating that landscapes and seascapes in places like the coastal Caribbean, mountainous eastern Australia, and the Brazilian Amazon are all susceptible to climate related impacts.

Co-edited by Drs. Jodi Hilty and Molly Cross of WCS, along with Dr. Charles Chester of Tufts and Brandeis Universities, the book reviews 19 case studies showing what communities, leading-edge scientists, conservationists, and others are doing to protect large landscapes as a means of conserving biodiversity in response to a warming planet.

“The case studies illustrate a global front to address climate change in our conservation activities,” said co-editor and WCS North America Program Director Dr. Jodi Hilty. “While each area may face unique threats, common threads include potential loss of biodiversity and ecosystem health, and in some cases, human livelihoods.”

The case studies provided in the book feature a fascinating array of projects illustrating the integration of climate change adaptation into conservation–planning:

• In central and eastern Mongolia, the creation of grass “banks” ensure that wildlife such as the endangered Mongolian gazelle have sufficient land for grazing, while also providing a place for nomadic herdsmen to graze livestock during drought years brought about by climate change.

• In Bangladesh, use of freshwater dolphins as bellwethers of climate-related saltwater intrusion informs proactive management of the Bangladesh mangroves and fishing areas for the benefit of people and wildlife.

• In Fiji, conservation strategies are focusing on increasing the capacity of local communities to manage the diverse natural resources of the Vatu-i-Ra seascape in ways that mutually benefit humans and biodiversity—including taking action to increase the resilience of coral reefs that can be affected by climate change.

• In the Yellowstone to Yukon region of North America, proactive planning and implementation will allow wildlife to move up and down the Rocky Mountains in response to climate change, and for communities to sustain the benefits of natural resources.

“While warming temperatures threaten to redefine landscapes globally, different regions face a unique set of challenges resulting from climate change and each will need to strategize its response based on those circumstances,” said co-editor and WCS Scientist Dr. Molly Cross. “The book is intended to offer conservationists and others guidance in incorporating changing climate into their projects and thinking about conservation on a regional scale.”

For additional information or to interview Dr. Jodi Hilty or Dr. Molly Cross, please contact Scott Smith at 718-220-3698.

Scott Smith | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.wcs.org

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Litter is present throughout the world’s oceans: 1,220 species affected
27.03.2017 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht International network connects experimental research in European waters
21.03.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Gewässerökologie und Binnenfischerei (IGB)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA laser communications to provide Orion faster connections

30.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study

30.03.2017 | Studies and Analyses

Unique genome architectures after fertilisation in single-cell embryos

30.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>