Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The Future is ... Green

02.09.2004


The first green accounts for a public sector body are published today.

A pioneering set of Environmental Cost Accounts are contained in the latest annual report from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). They focus on the environmental impacts and costs of its staff, facilities and operations. Using the latest scientific information available, Forum for the Future, a leading sustainable development charity, put an estimated price of £2.1 million on avoiding or restoring NERC’s environmental impacts. The main costs come from the energy consumed by its research ships, aircraft and buildings.

NERC Chief Executive, Professor John Lawton, said, “We need to be aware that our science causes environmental impacts and consider ways in which we can reduce our environmental ‘footprint’. I’m not saying that we should stop or reduce the scale of our world-class science, but we must set and achieve the highest possible standards for our own environmental performance.” “ We can hardly expect people to take the issue of climate change seriously and to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases if we’re not taking significant action ourselves,” he added.



David Bloomer, Director of Finance and Information Systems at NERC, is spearheading the Environmental Cost Accounts project which identifies NERC’s major impacts and highlights where it needs to improve its data collection. He said, “These accounts begin to put a price on the impact we have on the environment. Whilst there are issues to be resolved concerning some of the cost factors and emission measures used, I believe the accounts give us a good baseline to work from.” He continued, “ As we gain more experience in using the accounts they will become an important business management tool. They will help us to improve our performance and assist in our forward planning of policies for dealing with environmental risks and liabilities.”

To become sustainable NERC needs to reduce its emissions – around 32,000 tonnes per year of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, sulphur dioxide and methane – by about 60%. This will be a considerable challenge over the next few years. NERC is taking action to address its impacts and is setting up targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants. It is measuring progress with performance indicators.

NERC is already putting its money where its mouth is. The new Environment Centre for Wales, announced last December, will benefit from an additional £1 million in funding to meet the cost of various environmental features. These include photovoltaic panels, a combined heat and power plant and a ground source heat pump. This extra funding should ensure the new facility is a showcase for sustainable building design in the UK, as well as benefiting the taxpayer by securing lower running costs.

Sara Parkin, OBE, Programme Director at Forum for the Future and a member of NERC’s Council, says, “I applaud NERC in taking these steps towards being more environmentally accountable. I hope that many more organisations will follow their lead . People need to accept that they can’t simply go on unheedingly polluting the environment. Producing a set of ‘green’ accounts is an excellent method for identifying where impacts on the environment could be reduced either through prevention or restorative measures. ”

Owen Gaffney | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nerc.ac.uk
http://www.nerc.ac.uk/annualreport

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Preservation of floodplains is flood protection
27.09.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Conservationists are sounding the alarm: parrots much more threatened than assumed
15.09.2017 | Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>