Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The ranchland near Pincher Creek, Alberta, is a hot zone for grizzly bear encounters

22.03.2012
Grizzly bears vs. boneyards and bureaucracy

The ranchland near the southwestern Alberta town of Pincher Creek is a hot zone for grizzly bear encounters according to a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Alberta.

The research, led by former U of A graduate student Joe Northrup, mapped the locations of 303 grizzly bear encounters over the last 10 years. There were no human fatalities despite the fact that the vast majority of the encounters happened on private ranch land.

The researchers had strict guidelines for measuring a grizzly bear encounter. "We didn't count sightings of bears by back-country hikers," said Northrup. "We only documented encounters where there the bear approached people and there was a potential threat to the person or their property."

The researchers also surveyed the sites of bear encounters on or near private land and came up with a property description with a high potential for trouble in the Pincher Creek area. "Our research showed that a ranch house on a quarter-section that is lined with trees and close to a river bed has a high potential for problems," said Northrup. He added that river beds coming down from the mountains are a popular transportation route for bears.

By far the biggest attractant for grizzly bears in the ranchland area is dead cattle and Northrup says it's a complicated hazard. "Ranchers need permits to remove dead cattle because of health restrictions to control Mad Cow disease," said Northrup, adding permits can be time consuming and the researchers found another problem. "The land fill has to be able to accept dead cattle and the Pincher Creek dump doesn't have that kind of permit," said Northrup.

The solution lies with the human element say the researchers. 'When wolves threaten cattle ranchers can shoot at them, but there is no shooting grizzly bears in this area," said Northrup. "We have to find solutions like bear-proof bins for dead cattle to replace the old style boneyards that are still in use."

The research by Northrup, U of A biology professor Mark Boyce and G.B. Stenhouse of the Foothills Research Institute was published in the journal, Animal Conservation.

Brian Murphy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ualberta.ca

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?
19.02.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hoped
08.02.2018 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stiffness matters

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Magnetic field traces gas and dust swirling around supermassive black hole

22.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

First evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

22.02.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>