Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


GRACE Improves Production and Product Quality

As part of an international project, software experts at Siemens' global Corporate Technology (CT) department have created a model that closely links the development of products with the machinery that will be needed to manufacture them later on.

The goal of the recently completed EU-supported project GRACE was to improve product quality by changing existing manufacturing processes only - i.e. without utilizing higher quality and thus more expensive materials, or new processes.

The CT experts succeeded here by analyzing how all individual aspects of factory automation influence the quality of the finished product. Using so-called multi-agent systems, the specialists came up with new approaches for product development, and their methods are now ready for practical application.

Continual measurements of product quality as early as during the manufacturing process provide important information on how to reduce rejects and lower throughput times. Such quality testing usually isn't possible in traditional factory automation systems because the combination of individual process steps cannot be studied as a whole. The new model is able to identify factors (and their causes) that have a major influence on product quality.

The six GRACE (inteGration of pRocess and quAlity Control using multi-AgEnt technology) project partners examined the production process for a washing machine. Using their model, the Siemens researchers were able to determine how the manufacturing process for a shaft that drives the spinner centrifuge influences the quality of that component. They found out that optimizing one step in the multistage production process could substantially increase the shaft's reliability and service life. Even minor changes suggested by the model can lead to significant improvements.

For example, the researchers modeled just five of the more than 100 individual parts of another washing machine component, and two out of more than 200 product functions - and just the associated optimizations proposed by the model reduced the share of component rejects from seven percent to less than two percent.

A practical industrial test revealed further optimization potential for an existing production line. Here, the model concluded that two quality control stations were no longer needed. Instead, two new control stations were installed to monitor quality on another part of the line. As a result of this measure, the time needed for functional tests of the washing machines was reduced by 30 percent.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:

More articles from Machine Engineering:

nachricht Process-Integrated Inspection for Ultrasound-Supported Friction Stir Welding of Metal Hybrid-Joints
27.09.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP

nachricht Lightweight robots in manual assembly
13.09.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Machine Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

The nanostructured cloak of invisibility

25.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Oasis of life in the ice-covered central Arctic

24.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

‘Farming’ bacteria to boost growth in the oceans

24.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>