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Siemens Creates Innovative Sequencing Batch Reactor System

25.01.2008
Siemens Water Technologies’ innovative OMNIFLO interchange sequencing batch reactor (ISBR) system provides the most energy-efficient and the lowest sludge yield of any SBR on the market today.

Developed as the result of an existing installation’s performance, the newly branded ISBR system combines the company’s state-of-the-art OMNIFLO SBR system with its Cannibal solids reduction system.


Siemens Water Technologies’ innovative OMNIFLO interchange sequencing batch reactor (ISBR) system provides the most energy-efficient and the lowest sludge yield of any SBR on the market today.

The OMNIFLO ISBR system has an inherent biological nutrient removal (BNR) capability through the use of automated controls that provide optimum environments for each BNR reaction. It also produces a very high-quality effluent at varying flows and loadings. The small footprint OMNIFLO ISBR system produces a very low sludge yield of 0.05 to 0.25 pounds of biological solids per pound of BOD per day and, compared to a typical SBR system, provides increased flexibility as well as significant power savings.

Siemens’ ISBR system is ideally suited for plants that have high solids handling costs, high energy costs and tight effluent requirements. Installing just an SBR system helps plants meet state nutrient removal limits. But adding on a Cannibal system can also reduce high energy costs associated with aerating an aerobic digester, reduce the need for installing sludge handling equipment, and generally provide a more energy-efficient solution. Significant reductions in the amount of solids generated for disposal are also ultimately realized.

The ISBR system has allowed the wastewater treatment facility at a California casino to minimize solids wasting to less than 0.1 pounds of biological solids per pound of BOD treated. The facility has also used less than 10% of the power for solids treatment than was planned with the proposed aerobic digester. A single integrated control system from Siemens Water Technologies optimizes overall plant performance and serves as a single point-of-contact for the process. It also balances ISBR system operating conditions to help maintain effluent quality and minimize solids production.

OMNIFLO and Cannibal are registered trademarks of Siemens and/or its affiliates in some countries. With the business activities of Siemens VAI Metal Technologies, Linz/Austria, Siemens Water Technologies, Warrendale/Pennsylvania/USA and Industry Technologies, Erlangen/Germany, the Siemens Industry Solutions Division (IS) is one of the world's leading solution and service providers for industrial and infrastructure facilities. Using its own products, systems and process technologies, IS develops and builds plants for end customers, commissions them and provides support during their entire life cycle.

Siemens AG
Corporate Communications
and Government Affairs
Media Relations
Reference number: IS 1207.6825 e
Press Office Industry Solutions
Franz Friese
P. O. Box 3240, D-91050 Erlangen
D-80200 Munich
Tel.: +49-9131 7-46032; Fax: -25074
E-mail: franz.friese@siemens.com

Franz Friese | Siemens AG
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/water
http://www.industry.siemens.com/data/presse/pics/12076825.jpg

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