Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


The Next Generation of Tidal Stream Power Plants

Siemens continues to develop its technology for tidal stream power plants. In the future, the new model will deliver higher performance at lower costs due to optimized construction.

Today, the SeaGen power plant in a northern Irish narrows has an installed capacity of 1.2 megawatts (MW). The SeaGen-S will deliver two MW.

The Welsh government has now approved the construction of five of these turbines for a ten MW power plant off the northwestern coast of Wales. It is scheduled to go into service in 2015 and supply around 10,000 homes with environmentally friendly electricity.

The new rotors are the most apparent change in construction. Their diameter has been increased to 20 meters and each of them has been equipped with an additional rotor blade. That means that the new model looks somewhat like an underwater windmill. The Siemens experts promise that the new rotors will be better able to distribute the pressure of the water current. This in turn will reduce wear and lengthen the service life of the power plant.

The company wants to build more power plants using the SeaGen-S in underwater arrays similar to the one in Wales. In that way, large amounts of electricity could be brought together - as is the case with wind farms - and transmitted to the mainland. The construction of arrays also makes sense when the topological requirements for tidal stream power plants are taken into consideration. By contrast to tidal barrage power plants, tidal stream units don't require a dam. But that means that these power plants won't work just anywhere - they should only be constructed in locations with especially strong currents.

SeaGen is located at just such place, the narrows between the natural harbor of Strangford Lough and the Irish Sea. Here the water flows at a constant speed of more than 4.7 knots - corresponding to 2.4 meters per second.

Driven by this current the rotors of the power plant turn ten to 15 times per minute. The 1.2 megawatts generated by SeaGen supplies electricity to around 1,500 households.

In October 2012 SeaGen reached three significant milestones for commercial power generation. The facility has now generated 22.53 megawatt hours of electricity in one day, one gigawatt hour in 68 days, and a total of six gigawatt hours since the middle of 2008.

With these achievements, the technology has taken an important step toward commercialization and market maturity. For the development of the SeaGen-S, engineers have turned to the data that has been collected during the SeaGen's 25,000 operating hours to date.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:

Further reports about: Jet Stream Northern Irish Power Plant Technology SeaGen-S power plant

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging
25.10.2016 | Colorado State University

nachricht Did you know that infrared heating is an essential part of automotive manufacture?
25.10.2016 | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>