Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

“GEOPHYS with a GEEP*” Revolutionary Geophysical Data Collection System

30.11.2006
A University of Leicester geologist is taking the lead in the development of a unique instrument that will help professionals such as geologists, archaeologists and engineers automatically collect data about underground structures.

Rather like a sophisticated sledge, the data collection system will move on runners, towed by a small tractor. This gives the advantages over other survey methods of:

- its own GPS navigation system so it automatically records its accurate position

-computerised data logging system to record many sensor instruments simultaneously

- greater stability and smoothness in motion than wheeled vehicles

-keeping the delicate instrumentation on board at a constant height above the ground over rough terrain.

- Surveying continuously for extended periods making surveys fast and efficient.

The Geophysical Exploration Equipment Platform (GEEP) system uses a combination of differential global positioning system (DGPS) and on-board compass to detect its own position, orientation and speed. A wide variety of different instrumentation can be added to adapt the system for different surveys aimed at environmental, archaeological, engineering, hydrological or mineral targets.

The system is very fast in use since no preparatory position marking is needed, with no tapes or pegs in the ground. Fields occupied by livestock can be surveyed with little disruption to either survey or livestock. There is little or no mark or damage on the ground as a result of the survey.

Data measurements from the instruments are recorded by computers on the GEEP system and telemetered to a local base station where an experienced geophysicist can monitor the data quality, carry out initial interpretation of the survey, and adjust the progress of the survey on the basis of the received data, allowing the survey to be adapted to the particular details of the survey site in real-time.

Because of the “open-system” architecture of the system, it can be used in a wide variety of applications such as:

- archaeology similar to “geophys” seen with the television archaeologists, ‘Time Team’

-environmental surveys of “brownfield” sites

- exploration for metals or industrial minerals

but in a much shorter timescale than conventional surveys.

The project, led by Dr Ian Hill, Senior Lecturer in Geophysics at Leicester, was funded by a two-year Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) and is now reaching its conclusion. The complete system is currently being tested at the University of Leicester.

Dr Hill and his research associate have been working with the company, Geomatrix Earth Science Ltd, who are marketing the system commercially. Geomatrix Earth Science Ltd is one of the largest rental sources for Environmental Geophysical Instrumentation in Europe.

Dr Hill commented: “We have been working with Geomatrix on various stages of this project for over 5 years and this is an exciting and rapidly developing area as we incorporate new developments in navigation, and computer technology. The system is now available commercially Europe-wide, and the first commercial system are being shipped during December.”

*GEEP trademark Geomatrix Earth Science Ltd. (pronounced ‘JEEP’)

Ather Mirza | University of Leicester
Further information:
http://www.le.ac.uk/press/experts/intro.html
http://www.geomatrix.co.uk

More articles from Earth Sciences:

nachricht Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology
22.06.2017 | Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

nachricht How reliable are shells as climate archives?
21.06.2017 | Leibniz-Zentrum für Marine Tropenforschung (ZMT)

All articles from Earth Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Study shines light on brain cells that coordinate movement

26.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Smooth propagation of spin waves using gold

26.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Switchable DNA mini-machines store information

26.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>