Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Environmental award: Claude Lorius becomes first French winner of Blue Planet Prize

24.06.2008
The 2008 Blue Planet Prize (1), one of the most prestigious international environmental prizes has just been awarded to two researchers known for their expertise in this field: glaciologist Claude Lorius, emeritus senior researcher at CNRS (2), and Brazilian professor José Goldemberg (3).

Lorius, France's first winner of this award, is being recognized for his contributions to raising awareness about the influence of human activities on the environment. The award will be conferred at a ceremony in Tokyo in November.

"The planet will likely warm noticeably during the 21st century, with serious impacts on water resources, agriculture, health, biodiversity, and general living conditions for humans...," anticipated Lorius in the early 1990s. Although completely revolutionary at the time, these ideas are now commonly accepted. Through his research, this CNRS gold medal winner has contributed to increased awareness about the risks that humanity faces from climate change and about environmental impacts of human activities. "Protecting the environment has become a major and urgent challenge," he believes.

A pioneer of ice core drilling, Lorius gained international recognition for the work that he and his team carried out. This research established the link between greenhouse gas concentrations (methane, carbon dioxide) and changes in climate by studying records preserved in Antarctic ice samples. This vital discovery made it possible to reconstruct the earth's climate and the composition of the atmosphere, initially for the past 150,000 years and then for 420,000 years (with Vostok ice core drilling from 1984 to 1991 (4)). Lorius also presided over the European EPICA ice coring project at Concordia Station (Dome C). Thanks to this program, scientists now have greenhouse gas data covering the last 800,000 years (5).

*Claude Lorius, polar adventurer*

Born in Besançon in 1932, Lorius has long been fascinated by Antarctica. This emeritus CNRS senior researcher at the Laboratoire de glaciologie et géophysique de l'environnement (6), which he led from 1983 to 1988, participated in numerous excursions to Antarctica. In his forty year career, he totalled 22 expeditions, the equivalent of more then six years on the continent. His most famous excursions include: - Two winters in Adélie Land (Charcot Station in 1957 during the International Geophysical Year, and Dumont d'Urville Station), - Numerous research expeditions and ice core drilling projects far onto the ice sheet (Dome Concordia and Vostok Station).

His research work earned him the CNRS gold medal in 2002 as well as international recognition, as evidenced by numerous awards and honors (the most recent being a medal from SCAR (7) in 2008). He became a member of the Académie des sciences in 1994 and chaired the French committee for the International Polar Year. Throughout his career, Lorius has taken on a number of responsibilities at the national level (within CNRS, the Ministry of the Environment, the association for French polar expeditions, the Institut français de recherche et technologie polaires) and internationally (notably with SCAR, including serving as president from 1986 to 1990). He has dedicated much time to spreading knowledge about science, writing several books for the general public. His two most recent works are:

- Planète blanche: les glaces, le climat et l'environnement, by Jean Jouzel, Claude Lorius and Dominique Raynaud, published by Odile Jacob (2008);

- Le grand défi des pôles by Bertrand Imbert and Claude Lorius, published by Découvertes Gallimard (2007).

(1) It was in 1992, the year of Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, that the Asahi Glass Foundation created the Blue Planet prize. Each year, the award honors two winners: people or organizations that make major scientific contributions to the environmental field. The winners receive 50 million yen, or about EUR300,000.

(2) 2002 CNRS gold medal, awarded jointly with Jean Jouzel, senior researcher at LSCE-IPSL (CEA/CNRS/UVSQ).

(3) Secretary of the state for the Environment, state of São Paulo, Brazil, from 2002 to 2006.

(4) A project that included Jean-Robert Petit, CNRS senior researcher at LGGE.

(5) See the press release "Evolution of greenhouse gases over the last 800,000 years," which discusses in particular the findings of Dominique Raynaud and Jérôme Chappellaz, both of whom are CNRS senior researchers at LGGE.

(6) LGGE (CNRS/Université Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1), affiliated with the Observatoire des sciences de l'Univers de Grenoble since 2002.

(7) Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR).

Julien Guillaume | alfa
Further information:
http://www.af-info.or.jp/index/index_e2.html
http://www.canalacademie.com/Claude-LORIUS.html

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht RNA: a vicious pathway to cancer ?
14.08.2017 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

nachricht Extensive Funding for Research on Chromatin, Adrenal Gland, and Cancer Therapy
28.06.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit

21.08.2017 | Health and Medicine

Scientists from the MSU studied new liquid-crystalline photochrom

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>