Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fly eye wins scientific image contest

15.01.2014
Karin Panser from the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna received the first prize in the international ‘Huygens Image Contest’ 2013. Her winning photograph shows a strongly enlarged eye of a fruit fly. The company Scientific Volume Imaging (SVI) annually honors international researchers for outstanding microscopy pictures.

Karin Panser is a member of Andrew Straw’s group at the IMP Vienna. The team addresses the fundamental question of how the brain of a fruit fly functions. ‘We aim to understand how the fly processes complex visual input and translates that into a specific coordinated behavior’, Panser explains.


Fruit fly ommatidia, arranged in an extremely regular array in the compound eye

For her neuroscientific studies, she needs greatly enlarged, detailed pictures generated with a confocal microscope. To process and analyse her data, Panser uses the software ‘Huygens (SVI.NL)’.

As her contribution to the Huygens Image Contest 2013, Karin Panser submitted an image of ommatidia – single eyes of the fly that consist of several cells and are innervated by one axon each. Several hundred of these ommatidia form the compound eye of the fruit fly. The perfectly regular arrangement of the fly eye, together with the molecular staining contribute to the stunning beauty of the photograph which was awarded first prize by the jury.

Illustration
The winning picture can be downloaded in high resolution and may be printed free of charge: http://www.imp.ac.at/pressefoto-ommatidia
Caption
The image represents fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) ommatidia, which are arranged in an extremely regular array in the compound eye. Nuclei are shown in blue (DAPI), cadherin in red, and chaoptin in the photoreceptors in green. This Zeiss LSM780 confocal (NA 1.4/40x) image was deconvolved with Huygens Professional. Copyright: IMP
About the IMP
The Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna is a basic biomedical research institute largely sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim. With over 200 scientists from 35 nations, the IMP is committed to scientific discovery of fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying complex biological phenomena. Research areas include cell and molecular biology, neurobiology, disease mechanisms and computational biology.
Press Contact
Dr. Heidemarie Hurtl
IMP-Communications
Tel. +43 (0)1 79730-3625
mobil: +43 (0)664 8247910
E-mail: hurtl@imp.ac.at

Dr. Heidemarie Hurtl | idw
Further information:
http://www.imp.ac.at

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann
20.01.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Scientist from Kiel University coordinates Million Euros Project in Inflammation Research
19.01.2017 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>