Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Two ERC Consolidator Grants for excellent research work

Two up-and-coming researchers from Tuebingen, Germany, have been awarded ERC Consolidator Grants from the European Research Council ERC.

This year the highly esteemed grants go to Dr. Felicity Jones, Max Planck Research Group Leader from the Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, and Dr. Remco Sprangers, Independent Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology.

The ERC Grants are one of the most coveted awards among European researchers. Each year the ERC supports excellent young research talents of any nationality to develop an independent career in Europe. The promising candidates must have at least seven years of experience since completion of their PhD.

Dr. Felicity Jones
Being originally from Australia, the young scientist is awarded the ERC Consolidator Grant for her project investigating how recombination of genes and chromosomes influence adaptive evolution processes. Jones and her team members study the genetics of adaptation and speciation of threespine stickleback fish, which also live in the home waters around Tuebingen. Up till now relatively little is known about factors controlling this process and their importance in individual fitness, survival, adaptation, and evolution. Meiotic recombination is the technical term and describes a fundamental biological process that shuffles the genetic variation that is passed from parents to offspring. “We borrow a lot of tricks and tips from the departments of the MPI for Developmental Biology and the FML. This makes these institutes a really exiting place for evolutionary genetics and genomics,” confirms Jones. The prize money of two million Euros will be used in the next five years for the expansion of her research group, including new PhD and postdoctoral positions. In addition, the researchers will use state-of-the art genomic sequencing technology.
Dr. Remco Sprangers
The scientific project leader at the MPI for Developmental Biology spends his research time studying mRNA or messenger RNA decay. Sprangers, who is originally from the Netherlands, and his team will provide a very detailed and accurate description of how essential and central molecular processes in mRNA degradation are regulated and modulated. The scientists will also use NMR spectroscopy to follow how enzymes engage in a network of interactions that regulate the mRNA degradation process. “The level of detail we aim to achieve is currently not available for any cellular pathway of such complexity,” says Sprangers. His aim is to provide knowledge and methodology required to study additional and complex cellular functions.

The Friedrich Miescher Laboratory (FML) of the Max Planck Society is now home to three ERC funded research groups. Currently there are five research groups working at the FML.

Weitere Informationen:

Nadja Winter | Max-Planck-Institut
Further information:

More articles from Awards Funding:

nachricht Changing the Energy Landscape: Affordable Electricity for All
20.10.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

nachricht Emmy Noether junior research group investigates new magnetic structures for spintronics applications
11.10.2016 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Awards Funding >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics

'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory. Current ferroelectric materials are highly valued for their thermal and chemical stability and rapid electro-mechanical responses, but creating a material that is scalable down to the tiny sizes needed for technologies like silicon-based semiconductors (Si-based CMOS) has proven challenging.

Now, Hiroshi Funakubo and co-workers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with researchers across Japan, have conducted experiments to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia

21.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

Stanford researchers create new special-purpose computer that may someday save us billions

21.10.2016 | Information Technology

From ancient fossils to future cars

21.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>