Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smart as skin: intelligent corrosion protection

03.05.2012
Annually the economic loss due to corrosion amounts to ca. 80 billion Euro in Germany1. Affecting various kinds of materials, there is a common interest to create protective systems that can withstand this phenomenon. In steel industry this is usually achieved by galvanizing with zinc, which dissolves rather than iron when it is in contact with corrosive media. The group of Dr. Michael Rohwerder aims at further optimising the system. Thus a more reliable and efficient protection is ensured.

Research in corrosion protection has been increasing since the 18th century, especially with respect to steel.



The microcapsules filled with corrosion
inhibitor are released when the steel
sheet is cut. Quelle: MPIE

Galvanizing is a common protective means, but during the production process initial corrosive spots are formed right at the cut-edge. The idea that is developed at the MPIE is to incorporate microcapsules, which are filled with corrosion inhibitor, e.g. polyphosphomolybdate, into the zinc coating. As soon as the steel sheet is cut, the zinc starts to corrode and dissolve.

This is the starting shot for the intelligent, second protective system: the capsules are released from the zinc onto the steel and smeared along the surface by the cutting device. The inhibitor can be released and thus protects the steel surface.

Modification with thiols facilitates the integration into the zinc

“This is an intelligent protective system that automatically realises when and where corrosion happens, becomes active and stops again when the respective spot is healed”, explains Dr. Rohwerder, group leader in the department of Interface Chemistry and Surface Engineering. It works like a scratch in the skin: it is detected, healed and the initial status is restored.

For preparing these smart coatings, three work steps must be performed: loading of the silica microcapsules with the inhibitor, sealing them to avoid premature leaching and finally incorporating the capsules into the zinc layer.

The sealing procedure, however, has of course an immense influence on the release kinetics. By rinsing with water glass solution, the release is steady and slow. The incorporation into the zinc layer is the most difficult part. Unmodified, the hydrophilic particles are repulsed by the zinc and only adsorb on the surface.

Tabrisur Rahman Khan, a PhD student from Bangladesh, has now fixed the problem. He modifies the particles with zinc affine functional groups, such as thiols, which make the solvation feasible.

Max-Planck & Fraunhofer collaboration on intelligent corrosion coatings

Everything solved? Well, not completely. For efficient protection, a higher loading of the pores with the inhibitor must be realised. This is the focus of current research. Additionally, the concept of intelligent corrosion coatings has been expanded to systems with polymer coatings. The joint project ASKORR (Aktive Schichten für den Korrosionsschutz, active coatings for corrosion protection) is a successful collaboration between the Max-Planck and the Fraunhofer Society in this field.

Two Max-Planck and two Fraunhofer Institutes are sharing their competences with respect to nanocomposite coatings, agent containers, zinc coatings and the analysis of effective mechanisms in order to improve the protective coatings. “It is a huge challenge, but present results look very promising”, states Rohwerder.

1 Gesellschaft für Korrosionsforschung

Yasmin A. Salem, M.A.

Public Relations
Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH
Max-Planck-Str. 1
40237 Düsseldorf
Germany
phone: +49 (0)211 6792 722
fax: +49 (0)211 6792 218

Yasmin A. Salem | MPIE
Further information:
http://www.mpie.de

More articles from Automotive Engineering:

nachricht Two intelligent vehicles are better than one
04.10.2017 | Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

nachricht The Future of Mobility: tomorrow’s ways of getting from A to B
07.09.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

All articles from Automotive Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Study suggests oysters offer hot spot for reducing nutrient pollution

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

17.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic molecules

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>