Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

PolyU spearheads construction virtual technology development

11.09.2008
PolyU researchers have made significant progress in applying virtual technology to facilitate scenario planning for large-scale construction projects, enabling property developers and project managers to save cost and avoid delays.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)'s Department of Building and Real Estate (BRE) has made great strides in tailoring construction virtual technology to facilitate scenario planning for mammoth projects, thus enabling property developers and project managers to achieve better cost-saving and avoid unnecessary delays.

In developing this technology, Prof. Li Heng and his 12-strong team have not only published many research papers in international journals, but also turned theory into practice through working closely with industrial partners. They are now able to turn two dimensional technical drawings into vivid 3D images of skyscrapers and other complex building structures with details of nuts and bolts. More importantly, they can mimic every step of the actual construction process through visualizing the workflow as well as the logistics arrangement.

"Construction planning is a complicated process that involves optimal use of resources in a changing site environment. Owing to the limited functions of traditional planning tool, there is strong need for new technology which can visualize the construction process and enable contractors to try different methods, so that they can produce a feasible plan with optimal use of resources and within the shortest time," said Prof. Li.

This advanced virtual technology, which is now being adopted by major construction contractors such as Gammon Construction Ltd and China Overseas Holdings Ltd, has been put to good use in the planning process of many complex construction projects during the past two years. These include the Island East Commercial Building in Quarry Bay, Tseung Kwan O Sports Stadium (the venue for East Asian Games), Tuen Mun Police Quarters and the Venetian Hotel in Macau, to name but a few.

To support the further advancement of this technology, PolyU has recently established a Construction Virtual Prototyping (CVP) Laboratory. This initiative is also backed by strong industrial support, as China Overseas Holdings Ltd and Gammon Construction Ltd have each donated HK$1 million for the establishment of this Laboratory.

Earlier this year, the Central Government's Ministry of Construction has given research funding amounting to RMB500,000 to support PolyU's CVP Laboratory. This was also the first time that a local tertiary institution received funding from the Ministry.

The use of this new technology is spreading across the border. Two major mainland developers, namely the Vanke Group and China State Construction International Holdings Ltd, have also employed this technology in their projects.

The CVP Laboratory is now offering for industry personnel two types of professional services: (1) rapid prototyping of projects at the tender stage for contractors to vividly and dynamically present the feasibility of construction methods; (2) visual prototyping of project at the construction stage to develop a detailed and improved construction programme with minimum time and optimal use of resources.

Arthur Chan | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com
http://www.polyu.edu.hk/cpa/polyu/hotnews/details_e.php?year=2008&news_id=1480

More articles from Architecture and Construction:

nachricht Smart buildings through innovative membrane roofs and façades
31.08.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Organische Elektronik, Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik FEP

nachricht Concrete from wood
05.07.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Architecture and Construction >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Underwater acoustic localization of marine mammals and vehicles

23.11.2017 | Information Technology

Enhancing the quantum sensing capabilities of diamond

23.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to storing carbon

23.11.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>