Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


PolyU spearheads construction virtual technology development

PolyU researchers have made significant progress in applying virtual technology to facilitate scenario planning for large-scale construction projects, enabling property developers and project managers to save cost and avoid delays.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)'s Department of Building and Real Estate (BRE) has made great strides in tailoring construction virtual technology to facilitate scenario planning for mammoth projects, thus enabling property developers and project managers to achieve better cost-saving and avoid unnecessary delays.

In developing this technology, Prof. Li Heng and his 12-strong team have not only published many research papers in international journals, but also turned theory into practice through working closely with industrial partners. They are now able to turn two dimensional technical drawings into vivid 3D images of skyscrapers and other complex building structures with details of nuts and bolts. More importantly, they can mimic every step of the actual construction process through visualizing the workflow as well as the logistics arrangement.

"Construction planning is a complicated process that involves optimal use of resources in a changing site environment. Owing to the limited functions of traditional planning tool, there is strong need for new technology which can visualize the construction process and enable contractors to try different methods, so that they can produce a feasible plan with optimal use of resources and within the shortest time," said Prof. Li.

This advanced virtual technology, which is now being adopted by major construction contractors such as Gammon Construction Ltd and China Overseas Holdings Ltd, has been put to good use in the planning process of many complex construction projects during the past two years. These include the Island East Commercial Building in Quarry Bay, Tseung Kwan O Sports Stadium (the venue for East Asian Games), Tuen Mun Police Quarters and the Venetian Hotel in Macau, to name but a few.

To support the further advancement of this technology, PolyU has recently established a Construction Virtual Prototyping (CVP) Laboratory. This initiative is also backed by strong industrial support, as China Overseas Holdings Ltd and Gammon Construction Ltd have each donated HK$1 million for the establishment of this Laboratory.

Earlier this year, the Central Government's Ministry of Construction has given research funding amounting to RMB500,000 to support PolyU's CVP Laboratory. This was also the first time that a local tertiary institution received funding from the Ministry.

The use of this new technology is spreading across the border. Two major mainland developers, namely the Vanke Group and China State Construction International Holdings Ltd, have also employed this technology in their projects.

The CVP Laboratory is now offering for industry personnel two types of professional services: (1) rapid prototyping of projects at the tender stage for contractors to vividly and dynamically present the feasibility of construction methods; (2) visual prototyping of project at the construction stage to develop a detailed and improved construction programme with minimum time and optimal use of resources.

Arthur Chan | ResearchSEA
Further information:

More articles from Architecture and Construction:

nachricht Rock solid: Carbon-reinforced concrete from Augsburg
11.10.2016 | Universität Augsburg

nachricht Heating and cooling with environmental energy
22.09.2016 | FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz-Institut für Informationsinfrastruktur GmbH

All articles from Architecture and Construction >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>