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Dried mango in Burkina Faso: stick with your guide!

Mango is one of the most widely grown fruit trees in Burkina Faso, with national output running at around 50 000 tonnes/year.

Fresh Burkinese mangoes face strong competition on the export market from mangoes from Mali and Ivory Coast. To use up the resulting production surplus, cut fruit losses and gain access to new markets, the first drying units were set up in Burkina Faso in 1980, with the support of the authorities and NGOs. The country’s dried mango sector now concerns around fifty small firms, producing between 600 and 700 tonnes of dried mango for export and generating almost 2.5 billion CFA francs in revenue per year.

In the hope of expanding and improving operations, CIRAD and its partners have produced a guide to mango drying. The kit, produced in collaboration with the main players in the sector, is intended for small- and medium-sized firms, entrepreneurs and project leaders. The aim, in economic terms, is also to overcome the strong competition from Asian dried fruit in the "snacks" sector - mixed fruit snacks - and "complex products" sector - muesli, cereal bars, ice creams and confectionery. Asia does not yet have a foothold in the booming market for organic products, in which the African "dried mango" sector is trying to establish itself. In this context, quality, traceability and improved production tools and management practices are crucial in ensuring that "Burkina Faso", and more broadly "Africa" labels on products become recognized guarantees for consumers.

The kit comprises a guide setting out the main mango processing stages, from fruit picking to final packaging of the dried product. It also provides management advice and tools. There is a CD-ROM containing a simulation tool, designed to help entrepreneurs assess their drying plans, and a campaign preparation, monitoring and balance sheet drafting tool to help processors manage their operations more efficiently.

Michel Rivier | alfa
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