Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The Costa Rica guava, an atypical fruit and now an ice cream

08.01.2008
As its name suggests, the Costa Rica guava (Psidium friedrichsthalium Ndz.) originated in Costa Rica. It is a round or oval yellow fruit with a sweet/acid taste, somewhere between its "cousin" the guava and a passionfruit.

CIRAD imported this fruit tree into Réunion in 1993, as part of a plan to diversify agriculture in the humid highlands. To develop well in Réunion, the species has to be grown at heights of between 200 and 600 m above sea level, in which case it can produce up to 140 kg of fruit and may even double its yields after a devastating cyclone. The current production potential is estimated at around 15 tonnes a year.

Only two producers are currently growing Costa Rica guavas in Réunion, under the watchful eye of CIRAD, and until now, most of what they produce has been used by small-scale ice cream makers. However, the agrifood industry has also shown an interest in the past year or so. For instance, Glaces de Bourbon, a subsidiary of the CILAM (Compagnie laitière des Mascareignes) group, recently launched a new Costa Rica guava ice cream in supermarkets. The fruit has several good points: its distinctive flavour on the one hand, but above all its high vitamin C content (twelve times higher than oranges and three times higher than guavas).

The crop management sequence developed by CIRAD under a project aimed at diversifying agriculture in the highlands of Réunion limits the use of inputs and guarantees a "clean" crop. There had not previously been any technical references on this fruit, which was not grown commercially anywhere in the world: in its zone of origin, it was primarily grown in gardens and only occasionally in orchards.

If the product proves popular with consumers, it is likely to provide new outlets and enable the development of Costa Rica guava growing in the humid highlands. To satisfy future demand for the fruits, CIRAD is already storing plants, so as to plant new plots rapidly. These plots would serve both to provide new technical references and to supply the agrifood industry.

Helen Burford | alfa
Further information:
http://www.cirad.fr/en/actualite/communique.php?id=848

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Robotic weeders: to a farm near you?
10.01.2018 | American Society of Agronomy

nachricht Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win
03.01.2018 | American Society of Agronomy

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

Im Focus: A thermometer for the oceans

Measurement of noble gases in Antarctic ice cores

The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

White graphene makes ceramics multifunctional

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Breaking bad metals with neutrons

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

ISFH-CalTeC is “designated test centre” for the confirmation of solar cell world records

16.01.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>