Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pickleweed Tolerates Irrigation with Seawater and High Levels of Boron

10.10.2008
Researchers have discovered that reusing saline drainage water and applying it to salt-tolerant crops in California’s San Joaquin Valley can help reduce the environmental impact of excess drainage volumes. The study focused on pickleweed, sold in European markets as a salad ingredients, and its ability to tolerate irrigation with seawater and drainage water with high concentrations of boron.

Reuse of agricultural drainage water (DW) for irrigation is one of the few on-farm water management options available to growers on the west side of California’s San Joaquin Valley (SJV) for reducing drainage water volumes (San Joaquin Valley Drainage Implementation Program, 2000).

Management strategies that reduce drainage volumes are attractive because they would reduce the area required for environmentally sensitive evaporation ponds and lower the costs associated with disposal of the final effluent. Moreover, reductions in drainage volume would reduce the amount of trace elements (Se, B and Mo) and nutrients reaching the San Joaquin River and would help grower’s meet newly established targets for total maximum daily loads (TMDLs).

In sequential reuse systems, saline drainage water is sequentially applied on progressively more salt-tolerant crops where application of concentrated effluents to halophytes is the final step in the sequence prior to disposal or treatment. However the effectiveness of halophytes in reducing drainage volume is dependent upon their ability to tolerate extremely high levels of salinity and boron over the long term, maintain high rates of evapotranspiration, and thrive in saline-sodic conditions with poor physical conditions.

Grattan et al. conducted greenhouse experiments with Pickleweed, Salicornia bigelovii Torr., a halophyte native to North American coasts and arguably one of the most salt-tolerant vascular plants. It has also sold in European markets as green tips used in salads and cooking and its seeds produce oil that is high in polyunsaturated fat. The authors found that S. bigelovii grow very well over a range of salinity treatments (19–52 dS/m) comprised of either seawater or hyper-saline drainage water. Moreover, the plants were also able to tolerate high concentrations of boron (28 mg/L), an important constituent found in drainage water. The most remarkable find for Grattan and co-investigators was that evapotranspiration (ET) rates from these plants exceeded that lost from an evaporation pan by 1.5 to 2.5 times. Grattan and co-workers also developed a method to separate evaporation and transpiration by accounting for the changes in the isotopic signature of water in the reservoir due to evaporation. They found that high ET rates were due primarily to high transpiration rates (> 78% of ET).

“This finding is somewhat surprising considering this halophyte has no true leaves,” commented Grattan. Although some challenges remain regarding the consistent establishment of S. bigelovii under field conditions, these data indicate that hypersaline drainage water, characteristic of California’s Westside of the San Joaquin Valley, can be used to irrigate this halophyte and substantially reduce drainage volumes.

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the date of this summary. View the abstract at http://jeq.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/37/5_Supplement/S-149.

The Journal of Environmental Quality, http://jeq.scijournals.org is a peer-reviewed, international journal of environmental quality in natural and agricultural ecosystems published six times a year by the American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), and the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA). The Journal of Environmental Quality covers various aspects of anthropogenic impacts on the environment, including terrestrial, atmospheric, and aquatic systems.

The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is a progressive, international scientific society that fosters the transfer of knowledge and practices to sustain global soils. Based in Madison, WI, and founded in 1936, SSSA is the professional home for 6,000+ members dedicated to advancing the field of soil science. It provides information about soils in relation to crop production, environmental quality, ecosystem sustainability, bioremediation, waste management, recycling, and wise land use.

SSSA supports its members by providing quality research-based publications, educational programs, certifications, and science policy initiatives via a Washington, DC, office. For more information, visit http://www.soils.org.

SSSA is the founding sponsor of an approximately 5,000-square foot exhibition, Dig It! The Secrets of Soil, which opened on July 19, 2008 at the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum in Washington, DC.

Sara Uttech | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.soils.org

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Faba fix for corn's nitrogen need
11.04.2018 | American Society of Agronomy

nachricht Wheat research discovery yields genetic secrets that could shape future crops
09.04.2018 | John Innes Centre

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>