Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Champion Mare's Legacy Lives on with Unusual Birth of Filly

18.08.2009
Mira, a foal born Aug. 4, trots happily in Binghamton, N.Y., even though her mother died almost a year ago from a ruptured intestine. That is thanks to a team at Cornell, which is believed to be the first to successfully extract and ship eggs from a dead mare for remote fertilization and implantation.

After the mare died at the Cornell Hospital for Animals, veterinarian Sylvia Bedford-Guaus and her laboratory team " graduate student Lori McPartlin and technician Stephanie Twomey " made use of special tools and their expertise from years of research to scrape the wall of each follicle in both of the ovaries obtained from the mare, Rebaqua.

"The process is time-sensitive and very intricate," said Bedford-Guaus, explaining that the eggs (oocytes) can only be seen microscopically and must be collected from the ovary within a few hours.

"There were other approaches, such as shipping the entire ovary, but none that could offer the success rates we had with this procedure," she said, adding that when equine ovaries have been shipped before, few pregnancies have resulted in no live births because the oocytes do not stay viable within the ovaries.

Bedford-Guaus searched for oocytes under a dissecting microscope and washed them in a special medium. The process took more than three hours. "Racing against the clock," said Bedford-Guaus, the team packaged nine oocytes for overnight shipment to veterinarian Katrin Hinrichs Equine Embryo Laboratory at Texas A&M University, where the researchers had the expertise needed to fertilize the eggs.

In Texas, the oocytes were incubated in a medium that stimulated five of the oocytes to mature; they were then fertilized with frozen-thawed sperm from the third-ranked barrel-racing stallion in the nation, Frenchmans Guy. This procedure, performed by veterinarian Young-Ho Choi, used a micromanipulation technique termed intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The fertilized eggs were cultured for seven days. Two developed into embryos, which were then sent to veterinarian David Hartman at the Hartman Equine Reproduction Center in Whitesboro, Texas, who transferred them to a surrogate mare that was at the right stage of the cycle to carry a pregnancy. The mare was then purchased by Rebaqua's owner, Kristin Contro of Binghamton, who had the pregnant mare shipped to New York.

"Because there are so many horses in the world, prior to Rebaqua's never felt it was necessary to breed a horse," said Contro, who began riding when she was 10 and has owned more than 10 horses. "Rebaqua was as close to perfect as you could get. She was bred really well, so her genes were superb. Her confirmation was perfect. And, she was a champion barrel racer. I am hopeful that her foal will also have her heart. That's not something you can breed for. They either have it or they don't."

(Text by Stephanie Specchio of Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine.)

Joe Schwartz | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.cornell.edu

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Climate change, population growth may lead to open ocean aquaculture
05.10.2017 | Oregon State University

nachricht New machine evaluates soybean at harvest for quality
04.10.2017 | University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>