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Agriculture Scientists Building Better Beef

15.03.2011
It is a lesson taught in every school: Quality can be judged by one¡¯s grade, and scientists with Oklahoma State University¡¯s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources are working to help beef producers get the best meat grade possible.

¡°Marbling is white flecks of fat within the meat muscle,¡± said Gerald Horn, OSU Graduates of Distinction professor in beef nutrition and management. ¡°The greater the amount of marbling in beef, the higher its grade because marbling makes beef more tender, flavorful and juicy.¡±

USDA Prime beef ¨C approximately 2 percent of graded beef ¨C has the highest levels of fat marbling, so it is the most tender and flavorful. Most of the graded beef sold in supermarkets is USDA Choice or USDA Select. The protein, vitamin and mineral content of beef are similar regardless of the grade.

¡°Nutrition and management practices that increase intramuscular fat deposition relative to other fat depots have the potential to decrease production of excess fat, improve the efficiency of beef production and be beneficial to the U.S. beef industry in meeting the growing world demand for high-quality beef cuts,¡± Horn said.

Intramuscular fat deposition develops early during growth, and can be influenced by pre-feedyard management practices. All cattle start out eating grass; approximately 75 percent of them are eventually shipped to feedyards where they are grown to maturity, or "finished," being fed specially formulated grain-based diets.

¡°Rate of weight gain is a key determinate of profitability in stocker cattle operations,¡± Horn said. ¡°In general, breakeven selling price decreases as average daily gain increases.¡±

The objective of Horn and the DASNR research team was to examine the effect of forage energy intake and type of ruminal fermentation on growth performance, partitioning of fat among depots and carcass characteristics of stocker cattle. An important outcome of this research will be an increased understanding of the physiological mechanisms by which muscle growth and metabolism influence marbling development.

¡°Our research showed stocker cattle production programs that result in higher rates of gain and/or higher ruminal propionate concentrations increase marbling and backfat,¡± he said. ¡°At moderate to high rates of gain, backfat increases more rapidly than marbling; this indicates that moderate rates of gain during the stocker phase could enhance marbling relative to backfat.¡±

Horn said while there were wide ranges in marbling scores and backfat thickness at the end of the grazing program, marbling scores at the end of the finishing phase were not different when the steers were slaughtered at a common backfat endpoint.

However, days on feed during the finishing phase of the DASNR research project ranged from 83 days to 138 days.

¡°Greater average daily gain during the stocker phase is important for decreasing breakeven prices and increasing profitability in the feedlot,¡± Horn said. ¡°This is particularly important during this new era of higher grain prices and increased cost of gain in the feedlot.¡±

The potential effects of nutrition-management practices on marbling development are not just a matter of increasing fat. Of the four fat depots in the body ¨C visceral, intermuscular, subcutaneous and marbling ¨C the last one to develop is marbling.

¡ñ Acetate serves as the primary source of energy or ¡°substrate¡± for subcutaneous fat, whereas glucose serves as the primary substrate for marbling. Propionate is the primary precursor of glucose.

¡ñ High-quality forages such as wheat pasture provide more ruminal propionate than low-quality dormant forages, and supplementation of corn for cattle grazed on dormant native range increases propionate production.

Academic and industry studies that address the question of nutrition-management practices on marbling development historically have been conducted during the feedlot phase of production. This present DASNR study is unique in that it focuses on factors influencing marbling development during the stocker phase.

In addition to Horn, research team members include OSU¡¯s Clint Krehbiel, Phillip Lancaster, Udaya DeSilva, Gretchen Hilton, Evin Sharman and Texas Tech University¡¯s Jessica Starkey.

Oklahoma State University, U. S. Department of Agriculture, State and Local governments cooperating; Oklahoma State University in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, age, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices, or procedures, and is an equal opportunity employer.

Donald Stotts | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.okstate.edu

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