Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Better metal forming: magnetic pulses “bump” metal into shape

10.10.2002


Glenn S. Daehn


Graduate student Jianhui Shang holds two pans stamped from automotive grade aluminum. The pan on the right was stamped using traditional techniques. The one on the left was stamped using the same equipment, but employing Daehn’s electromagnetic bump forming technique.


A process developed at Ohio State University for shaping metal parts using magnetism has reached a new milestone -- one that may cut manufacturing costs and help preserve the environment.

The process could also expand manufacturers’ choice of available metals, and enable the use of aluminum parts in lighter, fuel-efficient automobiles.

Glenn S. Daehn, professor of materials science and engineering, and his colleagues pioneered hybrid electromagnetic metal forming in 1999, while collaborating with the “Big Three” automakers. With this process, a traditional tool and die stamps the general shape of a part out of sheet metal. Afterward, a magnetic field pushes at specific locations of the sheet metal to form fine details or complex shapes.



Now the Ohio State engineers have discovered that they can improve the process if they use the magnetic field to stretch certain portions of the metal during the stamping operation.

In tests, they were able to create an aluminum pan with a depth nearly 1.5 times greater than previously possible, and they did so without relying upon the potentially toxic industrial lubricants normally required for stamping.

Daehn described the improved process Oct. 9 in Columbus, OH, at the annual meeting of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, now known as TMS.

Daehn calls the process “bump forming,” because the magnetic field bumps against the metal in many short pulses -- typically 5 to 20 times in less than one second -- while the metal moves into the die.

Normally, as a sheet of metal bends to fit inside a tool and die, some parts of the sheet stretch more than others. These are the parts that may tear if the metal stretches too much.

With Daehn’s technique, electromagnetic fields work against the parts of the sheet that would not normally stretch, causing them to bow out. With this extra amount of “give” in the metal, other portions of the sheet will be less likely to tear.

The process works well in electrically conductive metals, including aluminum. When exposed to a strong electro-magnetic field from a coil inside the punch portion of the stamping tool, a corresponding electrical current and electromagnetic field form inside the metal. The field in the coil and the field in the metal repel each other, pushing the aluminum away from the punch.

Bump forming could be very useful in mass production, Daehn said. From the auto industry to aerospace and electronics, large manufacturing operations often need to stamp as many as 10 million copies of their metal components per year.

“The process has to be reliable, and require as little human intervention as possible,” Daehn said. “In automobile production especially, manufactures need to make parts in as few steps as they possibly can. I think we can do a lot of good things for industry with this technique.”

Daehn and Ohio State postdoctoral researcher Vincent J. Vohnout developed their bump forming technique with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., one of the largest manufacturing companies in Japan.

Using automotive-grade aluminum, the engineers stamped out a shape similar to a baking pan. Because aluminum tears easily, manufacturers typically need to coat the metal with lubricant in order to stamp it, Daehn explained. The potentially hazardous liquid is then washed from the metal and disposed of, at a significant cost.

With conventional stamping equipment and lubricant, the deepest pan they could create without tearing the aluminum was 1.7 inches (4.4 centimeters). After placing electromagnetic actuators in the same equipment and using the bump forming procedure, they were able to stamp a pan 2.5 inches (6.4 centimeters) deep -- a 47 percent increase.

Most significant to Daehn is that they were able to make a deeper impression using the same stamping pressure, and without using any lubricant.

Daehn counted off several potential benefits for industry.

“We can enable the use of higher strength materials and aluminum alloys in manufacturing. We can reduce the amount of equipment associated with metal forming. Parts that used to require multiple steps could be made with one set of tooling, which would mean a big cost savings. And we think we can eliminate reliance on these nasty lubricants,” he said.

From start to finish, the bump forming process can be designed to take five seconds or less per part, which would fit in with typical manufacturing cycles.

Daehn and Vohnout patented their bump forming process, and are seeking further funding to develop it. The National Science Foundation has largely funded the work thus far.


Contact: Glenn Daehn, (614) 292-6779; Daehn.1@osu.edu
Written by Pam Frost Gorder, (614) 292-9475; Gorder.1@osu.edu

Glenn Daehn | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.osu.edu/
http://www.mse.eng.ohio-state.edu/
http://www.mse.eng.ohio-state.edu/%7Edaehn/

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging
24.04.2017 | Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)

nachricht Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics
24.04.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

DGIST develops 20 times faster biosensor

24.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Nanoimprinted hyperlens array: Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging

24.04.2017 | Materials Sciences

Atomic-level motion may drive bacteria's ability to evade immune system defenses

24.04.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>