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DELO adhesives are used for the new glass/metal assembly system

23.01.2008
„BackPlate“ connects glass plates for banisters, partition walls or furniture without tensions and in a visually attractive manner.

As of now, a completely new way of fixing glass plates is available on the market – without having to clamp or drill them: With the glass/metal assembly method “BackPlate”, the glass plates are fixed by the flat metal surfaces protruding from the glass. Therefore, glass plates for banisters, partition walls and furniture can be aesthetically bonded without any tensions. For this purpose, high-performance adhesives made by company DELO Industrial Adhesives are used.


Glass fixing system „BackPlate“

Besides an attractive appearance, it is especially advantageous that the glass plates are not subject to restraining forces as is the case with point or clamp holders. Furthermore, the fixtures integrated in the composite can be easily cleaned. This assembly system, which is pending for patent application, was developed by lif GmbH, of which Schneider + Fichtel and DÖPPNER Bauelemente are part, in cooperation with SCHOTT.

With the method “BackPlate”, stainless steel sheets, which are previously bonded to one of the glass plates, are colaminated into the laminated safety glass. The light-curing acrylates used are transparent and, therefore, suitable for visually demanding bondings. Moreover, this adhesive is characterized by excellent strength and high temperature resistance and can also be used for safety barriers made of glass. Responding to the high safety requirements, the connection was extensively tested for its suitability for interior glass applications in DELO’s laboratories, for example, through experiments in a tensile testing machine and different aging tests. The results of these tests show that “BackPlate” stands out from the crowd due to its extraordinary load bearing capacity.

Due to its superior appearance, this system has already won several design prices like the if material award 2007 which awards the most innovative systems in the field of materials and material connections and is one of the most important design awards worldwide. This award is presented by if International Forum Design – an independent institute acting as interface between design services and business.

Furthermore, the product was awarded the MATERIALICA Award 2007 in the category „Design + Technology“ and nominated for the Design Award 2008 offered by the Federal Republic of Germany.

About DELO:

DELO is a leading manufacturer of industrial adhesives with its head office near Munich and 200 employees. The company provides tailor-made special adhesives for applications in all lines of business – from electronics to the chip card and automotive industry as well as in glass and plastic design. DELO’s customers are, for example, Bosch, DaimlerChrysler, Festo, Infineon, NXP (formerly Philips) and Siemens. In the financial year 2006/2007 the company gained a turnover of Euro 27 million. DELO has a network of worldwide distributors and sales partners.

Press contact:
Jennifer Bader
DELO Industrial Adhesives
DELO-Allee 1
86949 Windach • Germany
Phone +49 8193 9900-212
Fax +49 8193 9900-5212
E-mail jennifer.bader@DELO.de

Jennifer Bader | DELO Industrie Klebstoffe
Further information:
http://www.DELO.de

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