Latest News

Environmentally friendly plastic film of potato starch

Plastic made of potato starch is a promising material for packaging, which is a big new application for starch plastics. This is shown in Åsa Rindlav-Westling’s doctoral dissertation, which was carried out in Paul Gatenholm’s research team in polymer technology at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.

Our huge quantities of refuse could be reduced and a greater proportion than today could be composted. Combustion of materials from oil, such as conventional plastics and fossil fuels, ra

Hypothermia Helps Cardiac Patients to Live Longer

Approximately 375,000 Europeans suffer cardiac arrest every year – often with fatal consequences. Even upon successful resuscitation, several patients suffer severe and irreparable brain damage. One in seven patients could be saved and the amount of serious damage resulting from cardiac arrest could be drastically reduced by reducing the body temperature of those affected to between 32 and 34 degrees in the first 24 hours following the cardiac arrest. Such are the results of a Europe-wide study, in w

NO solution to high salt intake

Nitric oxide, normally toxic at high concentrations, is now known to be involved in a number of functions within the nervous system of many animals. New research being presented today at the Society for Experimental Biology conference reveals for the first time that nitric oxide is also present within the neurosecretory system of fish and may help them cope with changes in environmental salinity.

Within the mammalian nervous system it was thought that nerve cells communicated exclusively usi

Journal Retracts Support for Claims of Invasive GM Corn

The journal Nature has announced that a report claiming that genetically engineered DNA had found its way into wild Mexican corn should not have been published. The announcement, unveiled online last Thursday, came with two critiques of the study and a rebuttal by its authors. Though they are not retracting the original article Nature editor Philip Campbell states that the journal has decided to make the circumstances surrounding it clear and “allow our readers to judge the science for themselves.”

New mobile phone functions fit into a smaller space than before

Even a conventional mobile phone user demands more functions and better performance of his mobile phone in the smallest possible space. The mobile phone should also be easy to use, reliable and inexpensive. In order to meet these demands, more data and functions than before must be packed into the circuit boards of mobile phones in the future.

The researchers at the Helsinki University of Technology have met this challenge by developing a new type of production method for electronics, a so-c

Swimming pool chlorine risk to pregnant women

Research by Dr Mark Nieuwenhuijsen published in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine today (4 April) highlights an area of potential risk to pregnant women through exposure to the by-products of chlorination in swimming pools.
The following statement clarifies the potential risk:

Dr Nieuwenhuijsen, from the Department of Environmental Science and Technology at Imperial College, London says:

“There is no empirical evidence that chlorination by-products in swimming

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Physics and Astronomy

Obscure heat transfer behaviors

Discovery shows heat movement slowing down under extreme pressure instead of speeding up. UCLA researchers and their colleagues have discovered a new physics principle governing how heat transfers through materials,…

Astronomers observe intra-group light

– the elusive glow between distant galaxies. An international team of astronomers have turned a new technique onto a group of galaxies and the faint light between them – known…

An exoplanet atmosphere as never seen before

The JWST just scored another first: a detailed molecular and chemical portrait of a distant world’s skies. The telescope’s array of highly sensitive instruments was trained on the atmosphere of…

Life Sciences and Chemistry

How lymph nodes are supplied with blood

When our immune system runs it sets in motion antibodies, white blood cells and phagocytes. But how this works is not yet understood in all details – specifically, in the…

Nanoswitches for tumor targeting

SPRIND to finance spin-off Plectonic. Plectonic Biotech, a spin-off of the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has developed a nanoswitch that binds immune cells to tumor cells. The goal is…

Rogue immune cells linked to leukemia

… are a key driver of autoimmune diseases. Rogue immune cells are a major contributor to autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and aplastic anaemia. Gene variants associated with leukaemia can…

Materials Sciences

Soft touch sensitivity

A soft and flexible electronic “e-skin,” so sensitive it can detect the minute temperature difference between an inhaled and an exhaled breath, could form the basis of a new form…

A life-inspired system dynamically adjusts to its environment

The system regulates its own temperature in response to environmental disturbances. Researchers have developed a synthetic system that responds to environmental changes in the same way as living organisms, using…

Silicone sponge captures unknown bacteria

KIT researchers develop a chip that captures microbial dark matter in air, water, and soil – new tool for biotechnology and medicine. From human intestines to the bottom of the…

Information Technology

(Quantum) Whispers above the rooftops of Jena

Test link for quantum communication explores highly secure communication. As the crow flies, the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF is 1.7 kilometers away from the Stadtwerke…

Achieving a quantum fiber

Invented in 1970 by Corning Incorporated, low-loss optical fiber became the best means to efficiently transport information from one place to another over long distances without loss of information. The…

New software NNCodec for compressing neural networks

The Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI) has developed NNCodec, a new software that allows compressing neural networks to a fraction of their size without loss of accuracy. For non-commercial use…