Growing tiny carbon nanotube wires to connect computer chips of the future

Computers and electronic devices of the future will utilise technologies not currently available. An example of such a technology is the use of carbon nanotubes as interconnects for computer chips.

This is now a step closer to reality with some new work from nanotechnology researchers within the Materials Ireland Polymer Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin.

Previous work to develop such junction structure nanotubes used various different methods but this study embraced chemical vapour deposition as it allows in situ patterning of these structures. The researchers, Rory W. Leahy, Emer Lahiff, Andrew I. Minett and Werner J. Blau used a simple method of growing controllable densities of interconnect type multiwall nanotubes with high proportions of Y-junction and multiple junction nanotubes across etched patterns, using a simple catalyst preparation.

Their research work has been released as part of a special edition of the open access journal, AZoJono, and outlines a method for growing ordered arrays of interconnect type multi-walled nanotubes with the ability to fine tune the proportion of junction structures through control of initial conditions and processing parameters such as trench width and reaction temperature.

This special edition of AZoJono features a number of papers from DESYGN-IT, the project seeking to secure Europe as the international scientific leader in the design, synthesis, growth, characterisation and application of nanotubes, nanowires and nanotube arrays for industrial technology.

The complete article is available to view on AZoJono at http://www.azonano.com/Details.asp?ArticleID=2036

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Materials management deals with the research, development, manufacturing and processing of raw and industrial materials. Key aspects here are biological and medical issues, which play an increasingly important role in this field.

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