Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Software detects at-risk tissue in record time following a stroke


The FASTER software developed in Bern can detect within minutes the areas of the brain that will be left with long-term damage following a stroke. The previous version – BraTumIA for tumour segmentation – has been in use around the world since 2014.

In October of last year, a fully automatic computer program for the detection of brain tumours, which was developed in Bern, caused something of a stir on the international stage. The BraTumIA software only needs 10 minutes to analyse the tissue structures within a malignant tumour in very great detail.

(A+B) Conventional imaging (C) FASTER distinguishes salvageable tissue (blue) from brain tissue that will remain damaged (green) more precisely. Residual brain damage is marked red (D).

Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital

The self-learning system was developed and validated by biomedical engineers at the University of Bern's Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics (ISTB) in collaboration with neuroradiology consultants at the Inselspital. The software has been used by more than 200 users in over 40 countries since its release (May 2014).

From brain tumour to stroke

Drawing on the analysis mechanisms and experiences associated with BraTumIA, the team has now developed a new type of software that identifies areas of the brain that might be at risk following a stroke. The really clever thing is how it only takes the computer 6 minutes both to detect any tissue affected by a direct loss of perfusion and to predict which areas of the brain will probably be left damaged after an intervention.

This information enables doctors to identify more precisely which tissue has a chance of complete recovery and then free this in a targeted manner using a catheter. The system bases its risk assessment on pre-learned realistic scenarios.

First place for independent Imaging

On 5 October, the new software known as FASTER achieved first place (for stroke-related imaging processes) in the international ISLES challenge held during the MICCAI international biomedical conference ( The software was developed by Dr Richard McKinley, a mathematician and academic based at the Support Center for Advanced Neuroimaging (SCAN) within the Neuroradiology Department at the Inselspital.

'The close collaboration between the neuroradiologists at SCAN and the engineers at ISTB was crucial to winning this competition,' explains McKinley. 'Our approach combines precise algorithms, modern imaging and clinical expertise.'

From bench to bedside

The system operates independently, is constantly learning at the same time, and can be 'trained' by experienced clinicians to characterise strokes at lightning speed using MRI images. This directly improves treatment for patients – one of the stated aims of the Swiss Institute for Translational and Entrepreneurial Medicine (sitem-insel AG) in Bern. The research group is already working on a new type of software for the analysis of inflamed brain tissue in multiple sclerosis patients.

Further information:

Prof. Roland Wiest, Support Center of Advanced Neuroimaging, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Inselspital Bern, 031 632 36 73,

Prof. Mauricio Reyes, Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, University of Bern, 031 631 59 50,

Weitere Informationen:

http://Segmenting the ischemic penumbra: a spatial Random Forest approach with automatic threshold finding, Richard McKinley, Levin Häni, Roland Wiest, Mauricio Reyes.

Monika Kugemann | Universitätsspital Bern
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease
26.10.2016 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel light sources made of 2D materials

Physicists from the University of Würzburg have designed a light source that emits photon pairs. Two-photon sources are particularly well suited for tap-proof data encryption. The experiment's key ingredients: a semiconductor crystal and some sticky tape.

So-called monolayers are at the heart of the research activities. These "super materials" (as the prestigious science magazine "Nature" puts it) have been...

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Prototype device for measuring graphene-based electromagnetic radiation created

28.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Gamma ray camera offers new view on ultra-high energy electrons in plasma

28.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

When fat cells change their colour

28.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>