New collaboration set to make West Midlands hydrogen energy centre of the UK

The project, which has just received funding of £6.3 million from Regional Development Agency Advantage West Midlands, will develop the use of hydrogen energy as a green fuel. The project is the first capital activity to be funded as part of the Birmingham Science City initiative.

The Hydrogen Energy Project, part of an ‘Energy Futures’ collaboration between the universities of Birmingham and Warwick, will bring together and build on existing research excellence and will position the West Midlands as an internationally leading research centre for hydrogen energy.

With the continued threat of global warming, hydrogen energy is seen as one of the best ways of generating energy without producing excessive amounts of carbon or greenhouse gases.

The new project will research how hydrogen energy can be generated, stored and used as a power source in buildings and transport. The grant will fund equipment and facilities at the two universities so that they can further research and develop demonstrator projects with public and private sector partners. A key area of activity will be looking at ways of producing and storing hydrogen using sustainable methods, such as by electrolysis of water and from biomass.

The Science City initiative aims to pull together world class science and technology within a city and its region and provide that talent with support for new research that will deliver great economic and quality of life benefits not just to the City and the region, but also the country as a whole.

John Edwards, Chief Executive at Advantage West Midlands said: “As well as creating high level jobs and cementing the West Midlands’ reputation as the lead centre for Hydrogen Energy research, this project will lead to exciting collaborations between the two universities and regional businesses. This is enormously exciting as combining the research capabilities of two leading universities puts them on a footing with other world class research establishments.”

“Energy is a key theme of Birmingham Science City and something that we look forward to developing further in future projects.”

Dr David Book from the University of Birmingham says: “This is an exciting and very opportune development as the practical application of hydrogen as a clean fuel is a vital stepping stone on the path to a zero emission society.”

Professor Mark Smith from the University of Warwick said: “Hydrogen based power generation is a key technology that promises to provide relief from the world’s dependence on expensive and environmentally damaging fossil fuels.”

This award is just the beginning of a wide ranging “Energy Futures Programme” research collaboration between the Universities of Birmingham and Warwick that will encompass over 40 researchers in nine academic departments.

Media Contact

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