SUTD researchers resolve a major mystery in 2D material electronics

Schematic drawing of a 2D-material-based lateral (left) and vertical (right) Schottky diode. For broad classes of 2D materials, the current-temperature relation can be universally described by a scaling exponent of 3/2 and 1, respectively, for lateral and vertical Schottky diodes. Credit: Singapore University of Technology and Design

The understanding of 2D material-based Schottky diode is, however, plagued by multiple mysteries. Several theoretical models have co-existed in the literatures and a model is often selected a priori without rigorous justifications. It is not uncommon to see a model, whose underlying physics fundamentally contradicts with the physical properties of 2D materials, being deployed to analyse a 2D material Schottky diode.

Reporting in Physical Review Letters, researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have made a major step forward in resolving the mysteries surrounding 2D material Schottky diode. By employing a rigorous theoretical analysis, they developed a new theory to describe different variants of 2D-material-based Schottky diodes under a unifying framework. The new theory lays down a foundation that helps to unite prior contrasting models, thus resolving a major confusion in 2D material electronics.

“A particularly remarkable finding is that the electrical current flowing across a 2D material Schottky diode follows a one-size-fits-all universal scaling law for many types of 2D materials,” said first-author Dr. Yee Sin Ang from SUTD.

Universal scaling law is highly valuable in physics since it provides a practical “Swiss knife” for uncovering the inner workings of a physical system. Universal scaling law has appeared in many branches of physics, such as semiconductor, superconductor, fluid dynamics, mechanical fractures, and even in complex systems such as animal life span, election results, transportation and city growth.

The universal scaling law discovered by SUTD researchers dictates how electrical current varies with temperature and is widely applicable to broad classes of 2D systems including semiconductor quantum well, graphene, silicene, germanene, stanene, transition metal dichalcogenides and the thin-films of topological solids.

“The simple mathematical form of the scaling law is particularly useful for applied scientists and engineers in developing novel 2D material electronics,” said co-author Prof. Hui Ying Yang from SUTD.

The scaling laws discovered by SUTD researchers provide a simple tool for the extraction of Schottky barrier height – a physical quantity critically important for performance optimisation of 2D material electronics.

“The new theory has far reaching impact in solid state physics,” said co-author and principal investigator of this research, Prof. Lay Kee Ang from SUTD, “It signals the breakdown of classic diode equation widely used for traditional materials over the past 60 years, and shall improve our understanding on how to design better 2D material electronics.”

Media Contact

Melissa Koh
melissa_koh@sutd.edu.sg
65-649-98742

http://www.sutd.edu.sg 

Media Contact

Melissa Koh EurekAlert!

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Materials Sciences

Materials management deals with the research, development, manufacturing and processing of raw and industrial materials. Key aspects here are biological and medical issues, which play an increasingly important role in this field.

innovations-report offers in-depth articles related to the development and application of materials and the structure and properties of new materials.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Scientists achieve higher precision weak force measurement between protons, neutrons

Through a one-of-a-kind experiment at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, nuclear physicists have precisely measured the weak interaction between protons and neutrons. The result quantifies the weak…

High-performance single-atom catalysts for high-temperature fuel cells

Individual Pt atoms participate in catalytic reaction to faciitate the electrode process by up to 10 times. Single-atom Pt catalysts are stable at 700 degrees Celsius and expected to stimulate…

New method allows precise gene control by light

A novel optical switch makes it possible to precisely control the lifespan of genetic “copies”. These are used by the cell as building instructions for the production of proteins. The…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close