Monitoring biodiversity with sound: how machines can enrich our knowledge

The sounds of birds, in particular, can be easily captured with the help of recording devices Kevin Darras

“Data collection by people is less reliable, provides only approximate values, and is difficult to standardise and verify,” says first author Dr Kevin Darras from the Department of Crop Sciences at the University of Göttingen.

For comparison purposes, the international research team prepared a systematic overview based on data from previous bird studies. In addition to the collected sound recordings, they also compared the usefulness of both methods.

The result: sound recording devices can provide the same data as those obtained by people during bird “point counts” (the standard survey method where a person logs the birds they see or hear).

Sound recordings can be used to measure population densities and map territories of individual species. They can also record entire soundscapes and better measure animal activity over long periods of time.

“In a previous meta-analysis, we found that recording devices could detect and identify at least as many species as traditional ornithologists using standard techniques,” says Darras.

There are further advantages: enormous amounts of data can be checked, archived and automatically evaluated by computer programs to identify animal species.

“There are now very inexpensive, small devices that can record huge amounts of data over long periods of time and large spaces. In an increasingly data-driven time, they are the better choice.”

In addition to the systematic comparison, the study also provides a guide for scientists who sample the noises of animal populations acoustically. The authors give an overview of the currently available recording devices and discuss their modes of operation.

Dr Kevin Darras
University of Göttingen
Agroecology Group
Department of Crop Sciences
Grisebachstraße 6, 37073 Göttingen
Tel: +49 (0)551 39-33734
Email: kdarras@gwdg.de
http://www.uni-goettingen.de/de/412118.html

Original publication: Kevin Darras et al. Autonomous sound recording outperforms human observation for sampling birds: a systematic map and user guide. Ecological Applications (2019). https://doi.org/10.1002/eap.1954

Media Contact

Thomas Richter idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

High-thermoresistant biopolyimides become water-soluble like starch

This is the first report for the syntheses of water-soluble polyimides which are Interestingly derived from bio-based resources, showing high transparency, tunable mechanical strength and the highest thermoresistance in water-soluble…

Land management in forest and grasslands

How much can we intensify? A first assessment of the effects of land management on the links between biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are crucial for human…

A molecular break for root growth

The dynamic change in root growth of plants plays an important role in their adjustment to soil conditions. Depending on the location, nutrients or moisture can be found in higher…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close