How AI helps programming a quantum computer

The method developed at the University of Innsbruck produces quantum circuits based on user specifications and tailored to the features of the quantum hardware the circuit will be run on.
(c) Harald Ritsch / Universität Innsbruck

Researchers from the University of Innsbruck have unveiled a novel method to prepare quantum operations on a given quantum computer, using a machine learning generative model to find the appropriate sequence of quantum gates to execute a quantum operation. The study, recently published in Nature Machine Intelligence, marks a significant step forward in unleashing the full extent of quantum computing.

Generative models like diffusion models are one of the most important recent developments in Machine Learning (ML), with models as Stable Diffusion and Dall.e revolutionizing the field of image generation. These models are able to produce high quality images based on some text description. “Our new model for programming quantum computers does the same but, instead of generating images, it generates quantum circuits based on the text description of the quantum operation to be performed”, explains Gorka Muñoz-Gil from the Department of Theoretical Physics of the University of Innsbruck, Austria.

To prepare a certain quantum state or execute an algorithm on a quantum computer, one needs to find the appropriate sequence of quantum gates to perform such operations. While this is rather easy in classical computing, it is a great challenge in quantum computing, due to the particularities of the quantum world. Recently, many scientists have proposed methods to build quantum circuits with many relying machine learning methods. However, training of these ML models is often very hard due to the necessity of simulating quantum circuits as the machine learns. Diffusion models avoid such problems due to the way how they are trained. “This provides a tremendous advantage”, explains Gorka Muñoz-Gil, who developed the novel method together with Hans J. Briegel and Florian Fürrutter. “Moreover, we show that denoising diffusion models are accurate in their generation and also very flexible, allowing to generate circuits with different numbers of qubits, as well as types and numbers of quantum gates.” The models also can be tailored to prepare circuits that take into consideration the connectivity of the quantum hardware, i.e. how qubits are connected in the quantum computer. “As producing new circuits is very cheap once the model is trained, one can use it to discover new insights about quantum operations of interest”, Gorka Muñoz-Gil names another potential of the new method.

The method developed at the University of Innsbruck produces quantum circuits based on user specifications and tailored to the features of the quantum hardware the circuit will be run on. This marks a significant step forward in unleashing the full extent of quantum computing. The work has now been published in Nature Machine Intelligence and was financially supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF and the European Union, among others.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Gorka Muñoz-Gil
Department of Theoretical Physics
University of Innsbruck
+43 512 507 52257
gorka.munoz-gil@uibk.ac.at
https://www.uibk.ac.at/th-physik/qic-group

Originalpublikation:

Quantum circuit synthesis with diffusion models. Florian Fürrutter, Gorka Muñoz-Gil, and Hans J. Briegel. Nature Machine Intelligence 2024 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42256-024-00831-9 [arXiv: https://arxiv.org/abs/2311.02041]

https://www.uibk.ac.at/en/newsroom/2024/how-ai-helps-programming-a-quantum-computer/

Media Contact

Dr. Christian Flatz Büro für Öffentlichkeitsarbeit
Universität Innsbruck

All latest news from the category: Information Technology

Here you can find a summary of innovations in the fields of information and data processing and up-to-date developments on IT equipment and hardware.

This area covers topics such as IT services, IT architectures, IT management and telecommunications.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

‘Invisible’ protein keeps cancer at bay

Scientists in Germany have revealed how an unstructured protein traps cancer-promoting molecules. Each second of our lives, cells in our body grow and divide to ensure we stay healthy. However,…

Practical 3D tracking at record-breaking speeds

With speeds over 200 times faster than traditional methods, new technology could benefit autonomous driving, industrial inspection and security applications. Researchers have developed a new 3D method that can be…

Scientists discover new behavior of membranes

…that could lead to unprecedented separations. Researchers use new technique to overcome perceived limitation of membranes with pores of consistent size. Imagine a close basketball game that comes down to…

Partners & Sponsors