Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smart printing: power generating films and luminescent glass

11.04.2018

New inks for inkjet printers make it possible to print organic displays or solar cells on film and glass for the use in architecture, the textile industry and many other industries. These and other application examples of printed electronics will be presented by the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP at Printed Electronics Europe in Berlin from April 11 to 12, 2018.

Fraunhofer IAP at Printed Electronics Europe 2018: Booth K12

They turn light into electricity or vice versa: the inkjet inks developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer IAP can be printed on solid substrates as well as on flexible foils. In effect, solar cells and organic displays can be produced fast and cost-effectively.


Flexible photovoltaic elements, manufactured on Fraunhofer IAP`s own pilot plant.

Fraunhofer IAP

Together with research partners, the Fraunhofer scientists have developed methods to print organic photovoltaic elements for use in architecture and for the textile industry on film. With a solar module as façade element and a power-generating jacket, they present the potential of their work at the fair.

Printed displays rolled up?

Also for displays, printing processes are utilized at the Fraunhofer IAP. Using specially developed inks from organic light sources and quantum dots, the researchers print, for example, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and quantum dot-based LEDs (QLEDs). The displays can also be printed on different materials. Printing on film makes them flexible to some degree.

"Until we can flexibly roll up our televisions, we still have a little research to do", explains Dr. Armin Wedel, head of the research division Functional Polymer Systems at the Fraunhofer IAP. "Although there are already curved and even scrollable displays, they still have to be rolled up on rigid rolls with a defined diameter," says the OLED specialist.

ESJET printing for high-resolution OLEDs

New perspectives for the production of printed displays result from the use of ESJET printing (electrostatic printing). The scientists at the Fraunhofer IAP are working on this procedure together with twelve other partners within the project Hi-Response, which is funded by the European Union.

The ESJET printing process allows the use of a wider range of inks, as even very viscous inks can be processed. The drop-on-demand system also makes it possible to set the thickness of the printed layer very precisely. The printed structures can be as small as 1 micron. In the future, the printing of high-resolution, active-matrix-driven OLEDs should be possible.

Quantum materials for the display industry

In addition to OLEDs, the IAP scientists are also researching QLEDs based on indium phosphide quantum dots. They are free of conventionally used toxic cadmium. The results so far are groundbreaking for the industry. Indium phosphide-based QLEDs are gradually catching up on the performance advantage of cadmium-based systems in many areas. Regarding luminance, they are already outperforming cadmium-based QLEDs.

Dr. André Geßner presents the research results in his presentation:

„Concept For Full Color QD-Displays“
Thursday, April 12, 10.00 to 10.20 a.m.
Estrel Convention Center, Berlin; Room II

Funding

Solar powered LED illuminated bike jacket | This project has received funding from BMBF within the framework of the project EPOS, BMBF FKNZ 03EK2529.

Photovoltaics as a substitute for ITO electrodes | This project has received funding from the European Union‘s H2020-NMP-PILOTS-2014 programme under grant agreement No. 646296).

ELQ-LED | This project was funded by the BMBF under grant number 13N14421.


The Fraunhofer IAP

The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP in Potsdam-Golm, Germany, specializes in research and development of polymer applications. It supports companies and partners in custom development and optimization of innovative and sustainable materials, processing aids and processes. In addition to the environmentally friendly, economical production, functionalization and processing of polymers in the laboratory and pilot plant scale, the institute also offers the characterization of polymers.
Synthetic petroleum-based polymers as well as biopolymers, polymers from renewable raw materials and chemically, physically or biologically functionalized polymers are in the focus of the institute’s work. The applications are diverse, ranging from biotechnology, medicine, pharmacy and cosmetics to electronics and optics as well as applications in the packaging, environmental and wastewater engineering or the aerospace, automotive, paper, construction and coatings industries. | Director: Prof. Dr. Alexander Böker

Dr. Sandra Mehlhase | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Polymerforschung IAP
Further information:
http://www.iap.fraunhofer.de

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Special exhibition area "Microtechnologies for Optical Devices" establishes itself at W3
12.03.2020 | IVAM Fachverband für Mikrotechnik

nachricht Augmented reality system facilitates manual manufacturing of products made of fiber-reinforced composite materials
04.03.2020 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: When ions rattle their cage

Electrolytes play a key role in many areas: They are crucial for the storage of energy in our body as well as in batteries. In order to release energy, ions - charged atoms - must move in a liquid such as water. Until now the precise mechanism by which they move through the atoms and molecules of the electrolyte has, however, remained largely unknown. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now shown that the electrical resistance of an electrolyte, which is determined by the motion of ions, can be traced back to microscopic vibrations of these dissolved ions.

In chemistry, common table salt is also known as sodium chloride. If this salt is dissolved in water, sodium and chloride atoms dissolve as positively or...

Im Focus: Harnessing the rain for hydrovoltaics

Drops of water falling on or sliding over surfaces may leave behind traces of electrical charge, causing the drops to charge themselves. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz have now begun a detailed investigation into this phenomenon that accompanies us in every-day life. They developed a method to quantify the charge generation and additionally created a theoretical model to aid understanding. According to the scientists, the observed effect could be a source of generated power and an important building block for understanding frictional electricity.

Water drops sliding over non-conducting surfaces can be found everywhere in our lives: From the dripping of a coffee machine, to a rinse in the shower, to an...

Im Focus: A sensational discovery: Traces of rainforests in West Antarctica

90 million-year-old forest soil provides unexpected evidence for exceptionally warm climate near the South Pole in the Cretaceous

An international team of researchers led by geoscientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now...

Im Focus: Blocking the Iron Transport Could Stop Tuberculosis

The bacteria that cause tuberculosis need iron to survive. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now solved the first detailed structure of the transport protein responsible for the iron supply. When the iron transport into the bacteria is inhibited, the pathogen can no longer grow. This opens novel ways to develop targeted tuberculosis drugs.

One of the most devastating pathogens that lives inside human cells is Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacillus that causes tuberculosis. According to the...

Im Focus: Physicist from Hannover Develops New Photon Source for Tap-proof Communication

An international team with the participation of Prof. Dr. Michael Kues from the Cluster of Excellence PhoenixD at Leibniz University Hannover has developed a new method for generating quantum-entangled photons in a spectral range of light that was previously inaccessible. The discovery can make the encryption of satellite-based communications much more secure in the future.

A 15-member research team from the UK, Germany and Japan has developed a new method for generating and detecting quantum-entangled photons at a wavelength of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

13th AKL – International Laser Technology Congress: May 4–6, 2022 in Aachen – Laser Technology Live already this year!

02.04.2020 | Event News

“4th Hybrid Materials and Structures 2020” takes place over the internet

26.03.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

TU Dresden chemists develop noble metal aerogels for electrochemical hydrogen production and other applications

06.04.2020 | Life Sciences

Lade-PV Project Begins: Vehicle-integrated PV for Electrical Commercial Vehicles

06.04.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Lack of Knowledge and Uncertainty about Algorithms in Online Services

06.04.2020 | Social Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>