Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Polyamides from terpenes: Amorphous Caramid-R® and semi-crystalline Caramid-S®

09.10.2019

The Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB is using a new, recently patented process to develop new polyamides from the terpene 3-carene, a residual material from the cellulose industry. The biobased polyamides Caramid-R® and Caramid-S® produced using this process represent a new class of polyamides with outstanding thermal properties. The production of the monomer for Caramid-S® was already successfully piloted in a 100-liter scale. The Fraunhofer researchers will present the new polyamides at the K trade fair in Düsseldorf from 16 to 23 October 2019 (Hall 7.0, Stand SC01).

The Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB has developed a sustainable alternative to petrochemically produced plastics using terpenes found in resin-rich wood.


From wood waste to high-performance polymers: Terpenes from turpentine oil are converted to biobased, heat-stable polyamides.

© Fraunhofer IGB

The natural substances are available from conifers such as pine, larch or spruce. In the production of pulp, in which wood is broken down to separate the cellulose fibers, the terpenes are isolated in large quantities as a by-product, turpentine oil.

In the joint project “TerPa – Terpenes as building blocks for biobased polyamides” funded by the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) through the German Agency for Renewable Resources (FNR), researchers of Fraunhofer IGB, Bio, Electro and Chemocatalysis BioCat, Straubing branch have succeeded in optimizing the synthesis of lactams from 3-carene and the subsequent polymerization to Caramid-R® and Caramid-S®, representatives of a new class of terpene-based polyamides. Recently, a patent was granted for the synthesis process of the new polyamides from terpenes.


One-pot reaction sequence and scale-up to 100 liters

The conversion of 3-carene to the corresponding lactam is possible in four successive chemical reactions that require neither complex production facilities nor expensive reagents. The key steps to the polymer building blocks 3S- and 3R-caranlactam are the selective production of the intermediate 3S-caranketone and its selective rearrangement to the isomeric 3R-caranketone.

The special feature is that the conversions can take place as a one-vessel reaction sequence in a single reactor. "This offers the possibility to produce the lactams also in simple plants without a complex reactor cascade. It is not necessary to purify the intermediate products," explains Paul Stockmann, who developed and optimized the promising process.

The synthesis of the monomer for Caramid-S® has now been scaled to the 100-liter scale at the Fraunhofer Center for Chemical-Biotechnological Processes CBP, the Leuna branch of Fraunhofer IGB. "In this pilot production, we produced several kilograms of monomer, which allows the polymerization to be scaled to the kilogram scale," says Dr. Harald Strittmatter, who heads the TerPa project.


Excellent thermal properties

The chemical structure of the natural substance 3-carene, which has barely been used commercially to date and would be very difficult to access from petrochemical feedstocks, leads to new polyamides that contain cyclic structures along the polymer chain. Due to these rings and other substituents, Caramid-S® and Caramid-R® have exceptional thermal properties compared to standard polyamides: The softening temperatures (glass transition) are above 110 °C.


Caranlactams expand functional properties of standard polyamides

In addition, the scientists have converted the biobased lactams to copolymers with other commercially available monomers – laurolactam for PA12 and caprolactam for PA6. This enables the possibility of changing the properties such as the transparency of the polyamides PA6 and PA12, thus extending their application profile.

Currently, the Fraunhofer scientists are working on further improvements of the monomer synthesis which is essential for an economically viable polyamide. Furthermore, they are investigating the properties of the polymers in detail to identify potential applications and implement commercial use of the biopolyamides together with industrial partners.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Dr. Harald Strittmatter
Bio, Electro and Chemocatalysis BioCat, Straubing branch

Schulgasse 11a
94315 Straubing

Phone +49 9421 187-350
Fax +49 9421 187-360
E-Mail harald.strittmatter@igb.fraunhofer.de

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.igb.fraunhofer.de/en/press-media/press-releases/2019/polyamides-from...

Dr. Claudia Vorbeck | Fraunhofer-Institut für Grenzflächen- und Bioverfahrenstechnik IGB

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Special exhibition area "Microtechnologies for Optical Devices" establishes itself at W3
12.03.2020 | IVAM Fachverband für Mikrotechnik

nachricht Augmented reality system facilitates manual manufacturing of products made of fiber-reinforced composite materials
04.03.2020 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Biotechnology: Triggered by light, a novel way to switch on an enzyme

In living cells, enzymes drive biochemical metabolic processes enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very ability which allows them to be used as catalysts in biotechnology, for example to create chemical products such as pharmaceutics. Researchers now identified an enzyme that, when illuminated with blue light, becomes catalytically active and initiates a reaction that was previously unknown in enzymatics. The study was published in "Nature Communications".

Enzymes: they are the central drivers for biochemical metabolic processes in every living cell, enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very...

Im Focus: New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI

Early detection of tumors is extremely important in treating cancer. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The work is published May 25 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from...

Im Focus: I-call - When microimplants communicate with each other / Innovation driver digitization - "Smart Health“

Microelectronics as a key technology enables numerous innovations in the field of intelligent medical technology. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT coordinates the BMBF cooperative project "I-call" realizing the first electronic system for ultrasound-based, safe and interference-resistant data transmission between implants in the human body.

When microelectronic systems are used for medical applications, they have to meet high requirements in terms of biocompatibility, reliability, energy...

Im Focus: When predictions of theoretical chemists become reality

Thomas Heine, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at TU Dresden, together with his team, first predicted a topological 2D polymer in 2019. Only one year later, an international team led by Italian researchers was able to synthesize these materials and experimentally prove their topological properties. For the renowned journal Nature Materials, this was the occasion to invite Thomas Heine to a News and Views article, which was published this week. Under the title "Making 2D Topological Polymers a reality" Prof. Heine describes how his theory became a reality.

Ultrathin materials are extremely interesting as building blocks for next generation nano electronic devices, as it is much easier to make circuits and other...

Im Focus: Rolling into the deep

Scientists took a leukocyte as the blueprint and developed a microrobot that has the size, shape and moving capabilities of a white blood cell. Simulating a blood vessel in a laboratory setting, they succeeded in magnetically navigating the ball-shaped microroller through this dynamic and dense environment. The drug-delivery vehicle withstood the simulated blood flow, pushing the developments in targeted drug delivery a step further: inside the body, there is no better access route to all tissues and organs than the circulatory system. A robot that could actually travel through this finely woven web would revolutionize the minimally-invasive treatment of illnesses.

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) in Stuttgart invented a tiny microrobot that resembles a white blood cell...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

New 5G switch provides 50 times more energy efficiency than currently exists

27.05.2020 | Information Technology

Return of the Blob: Surprise link found to edge turbulence in fusion plasma

27.05.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Upwards with the “bubble shuttle”: How sea floor microbes get involved with methane reduction in the water column

27.05.2020 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>