Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Find the plug

17.09.2008
A pressure pulse through a pipeline can locate plugs, saving oil companies lots of money.

More and more oil extraction takes place on the ocean floor –not the easiest place to reach when it comes to maintaining and repairing pipelines that don’t function the way they should. Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have developed and patented a new technique called the pressure pulse method for finding plugs in oil pipelines on the ocean floor.

Robots in pipes

Wax deposits are currently the largest unsolved problem in underwater oil production. Oil that is sent from a platform was cooled when it passed through pipelines on the ocean’s bottom; as a result, deposits build up along the pipe’s interior.

Currently, when the flow through the pipe is restricted, the pipeline is shut down, and a robot is sent into the pipe to crawl its way through. Now and then these robots get stuck because they encounter obstructions that are simply too large for them. The operator then has to close off the pipeline and reverse the pressure, so as to get the robot unstuck. Sometimes the robot has to travel a long stretch of pipeline before it finds something to get started on. Both situations can take quite a long time.

Time is money in the oil industry, and lost production time can quickly become a costly affair. If a platform is closed for a longer period of several months because the pipelines are shut down, the costs can top NOK 10-100 million.

Water hammer

Professor Jon Steinar Gudmundsson, who developed the pressure pulse method, explains that he came up with the idea after he observed the shut-down of a geothermal well in Iceland.

”When a well like this is closed with the help of a pressure valve, a pressure wave is created. I realised that this pulse could be used for something constructive,” Gudmundsson explains.

The method is based on a seismic principle and is similar to an echo-sounder: A pressure pulse is sent out and the return signal is measured. “The principle is the same as what we call a ’water hammer’. That’s the bang you hear in a washing machine or a dishwasher when the flow of water to the machine is shut off quickly,” he says.

Mapping with sound

The reflected sound waves from the sound pulses can be measured using complex analytical methods. The measurements can then be used to create a map of the inside of the pipeline, right up to the next pressure vent. Such a map can show where the pipe narrows, and where the deposits are so thick that they plug the pipe. The information helps operators choose the best possible method for clearing the pipe.

Professor Gudmundsson’s idea uses existing installations to measure pressures. The pressure valve is already in place. The only thing that needs to be done is to close the valve quite quickly, which creates the pressure wave.

Markland Technology AS has been spun off of NTNU to sell the method to large oil companies, and has met with considerable success, says Gudmundsson. The business has been developed and licensed by Harald K. Celius.

Jon Steinar Gudmundsson | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ntnu.no

More articles from Process Engineering:

nachricht ScanCut project completed: laser cutting enables more intricate plug connector designs
06.08.2020 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht Analyzing pros and cons of two composite manufacturing methods
04.08.2020 | University of Illinois Grainger College of Engineering

All articles from Process Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: ScanCut project completed: laser cutting enables more intricate plug connector designs

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT have come up with a striking new addition to contact stamping technologies in the ERDF research project ScanCut. In collaboration with industry partners from North Rhine-Westphalia, the Aachen-based team of researchers developed a hybrid manufacturing process for the laser cutting of thin-walled metal strips. This new process makes it possible to fabricate even the tiniest details of contact parts in an eco-friendly, high-precision and efficient manner.

Plug connectors are tiny and, at first glance, unremarkable – yet modern vehicles would be unable to function without them. Several thousand plug connectors...

Im Focus: New Strategy Against Osteoporosis

An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.

Osteoporosis is the most common age-related bone disease which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. It is estimated that one in three women...

Im Focus: AI & single-cell genomics

New software predicts cell fate

Traditional single-cell sequencing methods help to reveal insights about cellular differences and functions - but they do this with static snapshots only...

Im Focus: TU Graz Researchers synthesize nanoparticles tailored for special applications

“Core-shell” clusters pave the way for new efficient nanomaterials that make catalysts, magnetic and laser sensors or measuring devices for detecting electromagnetic radiation more efficient.

Whether in innovative high-tech materials, more powerful computer chips, pharmaceuticals or in the field of renewable energies, nanoparticles – smallest...

Im Focus: Tailored light inspired by nature

An international research team with Prof. Cornelia Denz from the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Münster develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation. With the new method, the physicists cleverly exploit light structures that can be seen in rainbows or when light is transmitted through drinking glasses.

Modern applications as high resolution microsopy or micro- or nanoscale material processing require customized laser beams that do not change during...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2020”: The final touches for surfaces

23.07.2020 | Event News

Conference radar for cybersecurity

21.07.2020 | Event News

Contact Tracing Apps against COVID-19: German National Academy Leopoldina hosts international virtual panel discussion

07.07.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rare Earth Elements in Norwegian Fjords?

06.08.2020 | Earth Sciences

Anode material for safe batteries with a long cycle life

06.08.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Turning carbon dioxide into liquid fuel

06.08.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>