Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

£200,000 grant will be used to develop breakthrough low energy lighting

31.10.2006
The Advanced Technology Institute (ATI) at the University of Surrey has been awarded a £200,000 Carbon Trust Applied Research Grant to produce prototype solid state lighting devices using nano-composite materials invented at the ATI. This funding will contribute to a larger programme of development worth £465,000, which will use carbon nanotube-organic composites to fabricate ultra low energy lighting devices.

The ATI is confident that its Ultra Low Energy High Brightness Light (ULEHB) will require minimal power, significantly reducing both energy costs and carbon emissions. According to the Carbon Trust, lighting can contribute up to 40% of a company’s energy bill, so any technology which can provide flexible, low-energy illumination should have wide commercial application, as well as contributing to the UK’s fight against climate change.

Promisingly, Surrey's ULEHB could be used in a wide range of settings, as its long-life modular components are designed to suit a variety of applications, including signage, displays, street lighting, commercial lighting, public buildings, offices and image projectors.

The ULEHB light may also offer a cost efficient and clean replacement solution for mercury based fluorescent lamps and many other low efficiency 'heat producing' light sources. The patented technology can also be used for low cost solar cell production and has the versatility to be tuned to produce eye pleasing coloured light. Potential uses such as variable mood lighting over a whole wall or ceiling are also being explored.

Professor Ravi Silva, Director of the ATI and project leader said "This isn't the everlasting light bulb, but it is a highly energy efficient invention which could completely change the way we use lighting. ULEHB lighting will produce the same quality light as the best 100 watt light bulb, but using only a fraction of the energy and lasting many times longer".

Garry Staunton, Head of Low Carbon Research at the Carbon Trust, added: “We are delighted to be providing grant support to the University of Surrey, and will be monitoring the development of this exciting low-energy lighting technology with interest. Grants are a key part of the Carbon Trust’s work in encouraging the transition to a low carbon economy. Our aim is to support the best emerging thinking in the energy world, and bring the worlds of science and business closer together by converting theory into potential profit.”

Stuart Miller | alfa
Further information:
http://www.surrey.ac.uk

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Researchers discover link between magnetic field strength and temperature
21.08.2018 | American Institute of Physics

nachricht Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte
17.08.2018 | Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: It’s All in the Mix: Jülich Researchers are Developing Fast-Charging Solid-State Batteries

There are currently great hopes for solid-state batteries. They contain no liquid parts that could leak or catch fire. For this reason, they do not require cooling and are considered to be much safer, more reliable, and longer lasting than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Jülich scientists have now introduced a new concept that allows currents up to ten times greater during charging and discharging than previously described in the literature. The improvement was achieved by a “clever” choice of materials with a focus on consistently good compatibility. All components were made from phosphate compounds, which are well matched both chemically and mechanically.

The low current is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the development of solid-state batteries. It is the reason why the batteries take a relatively long...

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Air pollution leads to cardiovascular diseases

21.08.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Researchers target protein that protects bacteria's DNA 'recipes'

21.08.2018 | Life Sciences

A paper battery powered by bacteria

21.08.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>